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Ah. So it is a word then.
BRA - A shortened form of the word "brassiere", which I believe has it's roots in the French language, just ... even forgotten the original word) applying grammar to it never can be right, so "bras" is as good as anything.

Are you on something? We mustn't apply grammar to words which have been created by shortening other words?
HOSE - This I believe is the American form of "stocking", and I believe it is a plural noun. "Pantyhose" ... time just 100 years then you would probably not even understand your own language, at least not the finer points.

Rubbish. My grandfather was born in 1890 - do you think I would not be able to understand his speech if I heard him in the early 1900s?

And why is it unfortunate?

David
==
I don't know about the plural of "pantyhose" is, but ... another forum several years ago: When did pantyhose become widespread?

I don't think it was until a few years after they were introduced, because that's when someone got the bright ... in response to consumer complaints that the pantyhose were too hot and too troublesome to pull down for a quickie.

Which reminds me of two Golden Oldies:
He: My God, Sara, you're incredibly tight!
She: You couldn't wait till I took off my pantyhose!?

And
How do you know that a woman is wearing a pantyhose? When she farts, her ankles swell up.

Reinhold (Rey) Aman
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When did pantyhose become widespread?

That was during the War, when they were made of rayon. It was that, or woolens which itch.

Let us not forget the introduction of L'eggs in 1969. A seminal event?
Bra. It is no more a word than is "pram" or "bike".

Or "rhododendron".

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >If only some crazy scientist
1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 >somewhere would develop a devicePalo Alto, CA 94304 >that would allow us to change the

http://www.kirshenbaum.net /
Pantyhose and tights aren't the same thing in my world. ... keep one's legs warm when one is wearing a skirt.

Indeed, that is a pondian difference. In the UK, nylons are stockings - there is one separate item per leg. ... they range from the sheerest rayon (never nylon, I think) to thick wooly items worn by four year old girls.

Let's not forget the famous TV commercial in which Joe Namath wore pantyhose. (I'm sure he's never forgotten). Pantyhouse are made of relatively sheer nylon, but the important point is that they take the form of a single garment that extends from the feet almost to the waist. I'm old enough to think of nylons as stockings, extending no farther than mid-thigh, there to be held up by snaps on a girdle (an aspect of the sport of girdle-wrestling) or by garters.

I often wear socks made of nylon, but they're not "nylons." They are solid, not sheer, and come in colors, and never extend higher than mid-calf.

Bob Lieblich
And sometimes I wear shoes, too
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"Skitt" (Email Removed) wrote on 12 Dec 2003:
I don't think it was until a few years after ... someone got the bright idea to fit out the crotch

ObAUE: outfit

"equip" I might have used, but, W3NID:
Main Entry:fit out
Function:transitive verb
to supply with necessaries or means : FURNISH, EQUIP, OUTFIT, PREPARE friends fitted him out with a new suit and new shoes* *fit out a privateer
intransitive verb : OUTFIT the ship, a former merchantman, was fitting out as a privateer
I have no idea where this phrasal verb came from or how it got into my active vocabulary. I don't think I've ever used it before.

Ah, here's a classic EFL exercise in the making:
FILL IN THE BLANKS WITH APPROPRIATE ENGLISH WORDS:

"I have no idea where this came from or how it got into my

. I don't think I've ever (it/one) before."
with a vent in response to consumer complaints that the pantyhose were too hot and too troublesome to pull down for a quickie.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor.
Unfortunately we live in a world where the language is ... understand your own language, at least not the finer points.

Rubbish. My grandfather was born in 1890 - do you think I would not be able to understand his speech if I heard him in the early 1900s?

Indeed. I have heard phonograph recordings of people speaking at the end of C19 and I understood them better than I did some of the people on the BBC News tonight.
If we are to arrest these changes, should we arrest them as of now or backdate the changes a hundred years? Two hundred? What should we do to those dastards who fail to stick to the script?
John Dean
Oxford
De-frag to reply
Robert Lieblich (Email Removed) wrote on 12 Dec 2003:
I often wear socks made of nylon, but they're not "nylons." They are solid, not sheer, and come in colors, and never extend higher than mid-calf.

Don't they make your feet sweat, stink, and itch? They do mine, I've had to wear 100% cotton socks for the past 50 years because of that.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
"John Dean" (Email Removed) wrote on 12 Dec 2003:
Rubbish. My grandfather was born in 1890 - do you ... his speech if I heard him in the early 1900s?

Indeed. I have heard phonograph recordings of people speaking at the end of C19 and I understood them better than ... changes a hundred years? Two hundred? What should we do to those dastards who fail to stick to the script?

Shoot them all, of course. It'd kill two birds with one stone ("isseki ni cho" in Japanese, BTW): eliminate language abusers and solve the population problem forever.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor.
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