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Yes, thanks for confirming that. That's "pass as an American," by the way.

Or "pass for an American." That's what I would have written.

I think either would do. "Pass as an American" is appropriate for anyone; "pass for an American" is right only for non-Americans.

Matti
Or "pass for an American." That's what I would have written.

I think either would do. "Pass as an American" is appropriate for anyone; "pass for an American" is right only for non-Americans.

The latter being the case, innit?

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
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Did I get your interest up with that subject line? ... or not? one pair of panty/pantyhose/bra? two pairs of panties/pantyhoses/bras?

The bra does not come in a pair. One bra, two bras. A shelf full of bras.You would be amazed ... word - in England we say tights. One pair of tights, two pairs of tights, a shelf full of tights.

Pantyhose in Australia. Tights are thicker, more like leggings. However, 'stockings' seems to be taking over.
Panty is also more American than English, but it goes one pair of panties, two pairs of panties, a shelf full of panties. I don't know when you might use the singular. But in any case, we tend to say knickers.

At least we keep to knickers in Australia.

Rob Bannister
Yes, thanks for confirming that. That's "pass as an American," by the way.

By the way, it is not. The expression is "pass for an American".

Charles Riggs
Email address: chriggs¦at¦eircom¦dot¦net
'I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means "put down..."' Bob Newhart
Or "pass for an American." That's what I would have written.

I think either would do. "Pass as an American" is appropriate for anyone; "pass for an American" is right only for non-Americans.

WTF does that mean? When would either expression be used to refer to someone who isn't an American? "He's an American who could pass as an American", Matti is saying. Duh.

Charles Riggs
Email address: chriggs¦at¦eircom¦dot¦net
'I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means "put down..."' Bob Newhart
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I think either would do. "Pass as an American" is appropriate for anyone; "pass for an American" is right only for non-Americans.

WTF does that mean? When would either expression be used to refer to someone who isn't an American? "He's an American who could pass as an American", Matti is saying. Duh.

I assume you meant to write something a bit different there.

You can use "pass as an American" for someone irregardful of whether they are really American or not; more significantly, it might be said of an American who has lived in Britain for many years that "he wouldn't pass as an American".
You can use "pass for an American" only for someone who is not (thought by the speaker to be) American. It wouldn't be appropriate to say "he wouldn't pass for an American" of the American in the above example.

Matti
WTF does that mean? When would either expression be used ... who could pass as an American", Matti is saying. Duh.

I assume you meant to write something a bit different there.

Nope.
You can use "pass as an American" for someone irregardful of whether they are really American or not;

Why is "really" in that sentence? You're digging yourself into a deeper hole as you strain to avoid saying "mea culpa", or something similar. I'm also beginning to worry, of late, about your thinking processes in general.
more significantly, it might be said of an American who has lived in Britain for many years that "he wouldn't pass as an American".

You're wriggling. We weren't discussing the negation of the phrase, but it was cute of you to bring it up.
You can use "pass for an American" only for someone who is not (thought by the speaker to be) American. It wouldn't be appropriate to say "he wouldn't pass for an American" of the American in the above example.

The above doesn't pass for coherent English, so I won't comment further.

Charles Riggs
Email address: chriggs¦at¦eircom¦dot¦net
Yes, thanks for confirming that. That's "pass as an American," by the way.

By the way, it is not. The expression is "pass for an American".

Notice, friends and neighbours, how you'll never see a "My mistake" from Ms Richoux. She is God, and God is faultless. Oh yeah, *** too; he never makes mistakes.

Charles Riggs
Email address: chriggs¦at¦eircom¦dot¦net
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Yes, the goats would eat the books during the voyage, ... go to fetch the fencing material for the goat pens.

You've been on one of those middle-management bonding courses deep in the woods somewhere, haven't you?

Not for a long time. I've been trying to give them up.

But it is usually upper management that is most in the woods in severe cases, almost totally.

Regards
John