Did I get your interest up with that subject line?

I'd like to know what their plural forms are. Whether they normally appear in plural form or not?
one pair of panty/pantyhose/bra?
two pairs of panties/pantyhoses/bras?
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Did I get your interest up with that subject line? I'd like to know what their plural forms are. Whether they normally appear in plural form or not? one pair of panty/pantyhose/bra? two pairs of panties/pantyhoses/bras?

The bra does not come in a pair. One bra, two bras. A shelf full of bras.
Pantyhose is an American English word - in England we say tights. One pair of tights, two pairs of tights, a shelf full of tights.

Panty is also more American than English, but it goes one pair of panties, two pairs of panties, a shelf full of panties. I don't know when you might use the singular. But in any case, we tend to say knickers.

David
==
Did I get your interest up with that subject line?

Of course you did!
I'd like to know what their plural forms are. Whether they normally appear in plural form or not?

Bra. It is no more a word than is "pram" or "bike".

BRA - A shortened form of the word "brassiere", which I believe has it's roots in the French language, just like biscuit and mutton. Now that we have come to accept and use the shortened word "bra" in normal language (and even forgotten the original word) applying grammar to it never can be right, so "bras" is as good as anything.
HOSE - This I believe is the American form of "stocking", and I believe it is a plural noun. "Pantyhose" is where you sew a pair of stockings (hose) to a pair of knickers (panties) and market the result, along with sliced bread and ready-meals. Whether you have several pantyhose or just one, doesn't really matter: still a plural noun.
PRAM, by the way, comes from "perambulator".
BIKE, is a slang shortening for "bicycle".
Unfortunately we live in a world where the language is constantly changing. If you were to step back in time just 100 years then you would probably not even understand your own language, at least not the finer points.

Interesting point, in Arabic, the word for "glass" (the thing you drink out of) sounds like "finjaal", but the modern Arab would say "glass". To form a plural he then applies true Koran (al karim) grammar and says "glassaat". Both the ancient English scholar and Mohamad (pbuh) would turn in their graves if they heard this form of evolution.
Now if the pilgrim fathers had taken a dictionary instead of the Holy Bible when they set sail for the new-found land (now USA) then perhaps the Americans would be able to spell. Instead we now have to listen a "rooster", instructions like "initiate the engine", petrol called "regular gas" and fumble around with ladies chastity belts called "pantyhose".

Sorry! But you did ask!
BR MOTU
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Did I get your interest up with that subject line? ... or not? one pair of panty/pantyhose/bra? two pairs of panties/pantyhoses/bras?

The bra does not come in a pair. One bra, two bras. A shelf full of bras. Pantyhose is an ... of panties. I don't know when you might use the singular. But in any case, we tend to say knickers.

What's with the shelves? Were you trying to avoid the possible confusion arising from drawers?

Laura (expert on metaphorical underwear: http://tinyurl.com/yqnc ) (emulate St. George for email)
Did I get your interest up with that subject line? I'd like to know what their plural forms are. Whether they normally appear in plural form or not? one pair of panty/pantyhose/bra? two pairs of panties/pantyhoses/bras?

one pair of panties
two pairs of panties
one pair of pantyhose
two pairs of pantyhose
one bra
two bras
Any of those "pair of" words (shoes, trousers, scissors, panties, etc) can also appear without the "pair of," in certain forms.

Where are my shoes?
Where is my shoe?
He bought some shoes.
He bought a pair of shoes.
He bought several pairs of shoes.

Best wishes Donna Richoux
Now if the pilgrim fathers had taken a dictionary instead of the Holy Bible when they set sail for the new-found land (now USA)(snip)

Well, that's an interesting question. Could they have? Yes, the first known English dictionary was printed in 1604, just in time for the Mayflower.
Did they? Yes. From "Estate Inventories of the Pilgrims" http://members.aol.com/calebj/inventory.html
Myles Standish (d. 1656)
sword and cutlass, one fowling gun, three muskets, two small guns, featherbed, sheets, napkins,
pillows, malt mill, two saddles, beer cask, brass
kettle, warming and frying pan; BOOKS: Homer's
Illiad, Wilson's Dictionary, History of the World, Turkish History, Chronicle of England, Country
Farmer, History of Queen Elizabeth, Calvin's
Institutions, Roger's Seven Treaties, The French
Academy, Caesar's Commentaries, Bariffes artillery, Preston's Sermons, Burrough's Christian Contentment, German History, the Sweede Intelligencer, and A
Reply to Dr. Cotton.
No dictionary named here, but still impressive:
William Brewster (d. 1644)
black coat, green drawers, black gown, black hat,
gloves, red cap, black silk stockings, pistol, green cushion, "sizzers", dagger, white rug, tobacco and pipes, sword, stool, desk, white cap, violet coat, corslet; BOOKS: Moral Discourse, Discover of Spanish Inquisition, Description of New England, Remains of Britain, Ainsworth's Psalms, Mr Hernes works,
Babingtons works, Mr Rogers on Judges, Knights
Concord, Bodens Commonwealth, Surveyor, Willet on
Genesis, Messelina, Barlow on 2 Timothy, Parr on
Romans, Robinsons Observations, Right Way to go to Work, Atterson's Badges of Christianity, Treasury of Similes, Downfall of Popery, Bolton on True
Happyness, Plea for Infants, Discovery by Barrow,
Hackhill History of Indies, Perkins on Jude, Sweeds Intelligencer, Politike Diseases, Standish for
woods, History of Mary Glover, The Morality of Law, plus about 300 other books, plus another 65 books
written in Latin.
The third bookish man was William Bradford, largely theological books but also science.
These books could have arrived on later ships, of course. Does that still count, or was it Mayflower or nothing?
On the lists of provisions for the Mayflower itself, the travellers seemed preoccupied with loading enough blankets, oatmeal, pans, ammunition, those sorts of things. But books are still mentioned in "A Catalog of such needefull things as every Planter doth or ought to provide to go to New-England":
Also there are divers other things necessary to bee taken over to this Plantation, as Bookes, Nets, Hookes and Lines, Cheese, Bacon, Kine, Goats, &c.
Books, goats, difficult choices.

Best Donna Richoux
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Did I get your interest up with that subject line? I'd like to know what their plural forms are. Whether they normally appear in plural form or not? one pair of panty/pantyhose/bra? two pairs of panties/pantyhoses/bras?

I don't know about the plural of "pantyhose" is, but talk of pantyhose always brings to mind a question that was asked innocently in another forum several years ago:
When did pantyhose become widespread?
I know I've mentioned this before in AUE; in fact, Dejagoogle tells me I've mentioned it five times in the past eight years. But I think it's amusing enough to bear repeating now and then.
Bob Cunningham (Email Removed) wrote on 11 Dec 2003:
Did I get your interest up with that subject line? ... or not? one pair of panty/pantyhose/bra? two pairs of panties/pantyhoses/bras?

I don't know about the plural of "pantyhose" is, but talk of pantyhose always brings to mind a question that was asked innocently in another forum several years ago: When did pantyhose become widespread?

I don't think it was until a few years after they were introduced, because that's when someone got the bright idea to fit out the crotch with a vent in response to consumer complaints that the pantyhose were too hot and too troublesome to pull down for a quickie.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor.
Now if the pilgrim fathers had taken a dictionary instead of the Holy Bible when they set sail for the new-found land (now USA)

(snip) Well, that's an interesting question. Could they have? Yes, the first known English dictionary was printed in 1604, just ... Christian Contentment, German History, the Sweede Intelligencer, and A Reply to Dr. Cotton. No dictionary named here, but still impressive:

Slow down, Donna; you're hurrying too much.
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