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Laura F. Spira put finger to keyboard in this fashion:

Of course. I'm just a bit tetchy today. Blame it on the food.

What, the matzo brie?

Soft cheese on matzo YUM!
Oh, wait, you meant matzo brei. Never mind.
Hey, you, food! Come over here and take your punishment!

Hey, at least we don't have to fast for Pesach. After two seders with turkey and brisket and lamb and matzo-farfel stuffing and tsimmes and ... and ..., I'm going to need an unscheduled fast just to break even.

Liebs
After moving back to the UK, following a couple of ... think that I can work any magic with "vest", unfortunately.

Tell them that, when the weather gets cold, you plan to wear a jumper to the office.

I had to look that up; good one!
Jokes about going out to the alleyway for a fag seem a bit obvious, and I'd have to take up smoking beforehand.

Andrew Gwilliam
To email me, replace "bottomless pit" with "silverhelm"
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Your patience with this astonishing vulgarian perhaps qualifies you too for some sort of elevation.
The wet suit is a precaution - I wear it for dinghy sailing. One doesn't expect to get wet under normal circumstances.

One doesn't?
Charles Riggs
There are no accented letters in my email address.
I have occasionally heard the word "pantywaist" used as a ... waistband of knickers, because in my experience contingency promises excitement.

It's a derogatory term for someone who is seen as effeminate or a sissy. So it doesn't directly mean "liberal" ... pantywaist (panty-waist) was originally a garment made by attaching a top undergarment (BrE "vest") to underpants. John Dean Oxford

After seeing that the *Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary* gave for "pantywaist" only the sense "sissy," I looked up the term in The Century Dictionary of 1895. It wasn't there, but I did come across the following interesting entry:
From
www.century-dictionary.com
(quote)
pants , n. pl. (Abbrev. < pantaloons, q. v.) Same as pantaloons, 2. (Colloq. and vulgar.)
The thing named pants in certain documents,
A word not made for gentlemen but "gents."
O. W. Holmes, A Rhymed Lesson.
Gent and pants. Let these words go together, like the things they signify. The one always wears the other. R. G. White. Words and their Uses, p. 211
(end quote)
I would have thought the editors could have found another, different cite for the term, instead of having two that were so very similar, both relating "gent" to "pants."
I subsequently looked up "pantywaist" in MWCD11, which dated the term to
1936 and gave the first (historically oldest) meaning as "a child's garmentconsisting of short pants buttoned to a waist."

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com .
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
W3NID says this: Main Entry:1pantywaist Function:noun Etymology:panty + waist 1 : a child's garment consisting of short pants buttoned to a waist 2 : SISSY

My impression of the bridge between the two meanings, based on vague memories from the 1940s, is that it was boxers' slang for someone easily defeated, a pushover.

Joe Fineman joe (Email Removed)
Charles Riggs put finger to keyboard in this fashion:
The wet suit is a precaution - I wear it for dinghy sailing. One doesn't expect to get wet under normal circumstances.

One doesn't?

Not immersed, is what I meant. Good sailors get splashed but don't go swimming.

David
==
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To which I must add: Big girl's blouse;

He knows, you know ...

Who is Cynthia? What is she? Not Sabrina, whose image was first triggered. Well, it would be, wouldn't it?

Paul
In bocca al Lupo!
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W3NID says this: Main Entry:1pantywaist Function:noun Etymology:panty + waist 1 : a child's garment consisting of short pants buttoned to a waist 2 : SISSY

My impression of the bridge between the two meanings, based on vague memories from the 1940s, is that it was boxers' slang for someone easily defeated, a pushover.

That is a curious definition though, if it is accurate. Beastly parents I'd say.
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