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Hi

This sentence is from an exercise that requires the learner to check for faulty parallelism

I have read the book, but I have not watched the movie version.


I do not know which of these is correct.

1. I have read the book but have not watched the movie version.

2. I have read the book but not watched the movie version.

Please give your views.

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It's rather commonly said this way:

I read the book but haven't seen the movie.

Comments  

I would say, "I have read the book, but I haven't watched the movie." "Version" is superfluous (though not wrong), and nobody I know would include it.

Both of your sentences are perfectly correct, and there is little to choose between them. Maybe bridging the helping verb as in number 2 is a bit unusual.

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AlpheccaStars

It's rather commonly said this way:

I read the book but haven't seen the movie.

Thank you.

In the context of faulty parallelism, which of the two do you think is strictly grammatical?

anonymous

I would say, "I have read the book, but I haven't watched the movie." "Version" is superfluous (though not wrong), and nobody I know would include it.


Thank you. I understand.

anonymousMaybe bridging the helping verb as in number 2 is a bit unusual.

Okay. Thank you

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It is truly nitpicking, but the first has perfect parallel structure. The auxiliary verb is repeated in the second predicate because it is negated.

I've read the book and seen the movie based on it. (compound predicates, perfectly grammatical.)

I've read the book but not seen the movie based on it. (A bit non-parallel but very common. )

AlpheccaStarsIt is truly nitpicking, but the first has perfect parallel structure.

I understand. In some assessments conducted for job recruitment (for final year students) such questions are asked. That was why I was a little particular.

AlpheccaStarsThe auxiliary verb is repeated in the second predicate because it is negated.

I too felt that.

AlpheccaStarsI've read the book and seen the movie based on it. (compound predicates, perfectly grammatical.)

Got it. Thank you

AlpheccaStarsI've read the book but not seen the movie based on it. (A bit non-parallel but very common. )

Understand. Will avoid it here.


Thank you very much