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Can you give me a paraphrase or two? I'm not happy with how informal it sounds.

Also, I'm not happy with the emboldened words.

And what do you thinik about the use of the 'with' phrase?

a. The job seemed hugely exciting, with all the huge changes you are making to your business

b. The job seemed hugely exciting, partly because of all the huge changes you are making to your business.

c. The job seemed hugely exciting, what with all the huge changes you are making to your business.

d. With all the huge changes you are making to your business, the job seemed hugely exciting.

Thanks
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Hi,

Can you give me a paraphrase or two? I'm not happy with how informal it sounds.

Also, I'm not happy with the emboldened words.

To bring up the formality a bit, I'd just say 'very exciting' and 'enormous changes ' or 'significant changes'.

In addition, in C, 'what with all' is an inherently conversational structure.

And what do you thinik about the use of the 'with' phrase?

It's OK. It makes a weaker causal connection than 'because'.

a. The job seemed hugely exciting, with all the huge changes you are making to your business

b. The job seemed hugely exciting, partly because of all the huge changes you are making to your business.

c. The job seemed hugely exciting, what with all the huge changes you are making to your business.

d. With all the huge changes you are making to your business, the job seemed hugely exciting.

Why have you chosen the Simple Past 'seemed'?

Clive
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Hi, Clive Emotion: smile

Thanks for your great response.

Do you have a better way to say this? Or do you think 'with/because' are perfectly fine ways to phrase this?
CliveWhy have you chosen the Simple Past 'seemed'?
Good question.

Wouldn't it be correct to use the simple past if you didn't get the job you applied for?

But if you did get the job, you would use the simple present?
Hi,

Do you have a better way to say this? Or do you think 'with/because' are perfectly fine ways to phrase this? They are fine.

The job seemed hugely exciting, partly because of all the huge changes you are making to your business.

Wouldn't it be correct to use the simple past if you didn't get the job you applied for?

In this context, Simple Past sounds OK.

But if you did get the job, you would use the simple present? Yes, if I still like the job.

But If I feel disappointed by the job, I'd suggest that by using Simple Past.

Clive