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A: Did you drive?

B: Yes. Are they holding a big event in this hotel? The parking lot was full. I had to park along/by/on the street.

A: I guess so. This place is crowded from wall to wall. I too parked along the street. Hope I don't get a ticket.

1. Are there any mistakes?

2. Which preposition is correct?

Thanks
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Comments  
No mistakes. However, I'd move too to the end of the sentence: I had to park on the street too. I don't find crowded from wall to wall the right expression here, but I don't know what I'd say instead.
on the street
CJ
CalifJimNo mistakes. However, I'd move too to the end of the sentence: I had to park on the street too. I don't find crowded from wall to wall the right expression here, but I don't know what I'd say instead.
on the street
CJ
How about, "this place is packed"?
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RayHHow about, "this place is packed"?
Yes. That'll do.
CJ
I still can't understand why on is preferred when on the pavement, as opposed to on the sidewalk, is implied.

Logically, by or maybe 'in' since it's in the area between the opposing sidewalks. Any idea?

What's the difference between 'is crowded' and 'is packed'? By the way, I learned the phrase 'from wall to wall' from a novel and I know novels use uncommon or weird phrases to grab attention or create special effects. I don't know whether I should continue reading novels as they screw up my language.
New2grammarWhat's the difference between 'is crowded' and 'is packed'?
There's nothing wrong with saying someplace is crowded it's just that saying "crowded from wall to wall" is not something you hear from native speakers. If you want to emphasize how crowded a place is and still used the word "crowded" try "this place is really crowded" or "man, is this place crowded".

As to "on" versus "in" versus "by" I'm guessing it's determined by idiomatic usage far more that logic.
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Thanks, RayH.
New2grammarI still can't understand why on is preferred when on the pavement, as opposed to on the sidewalk, is implied.
Well, I don't know if anybody understands it, really! I have no idea why some of these prepositions become the preferred ones in certain cases! Emotion: big smile
If you can't find a place to park in the parking lot, you'll have to park on the street.
You can avoid the brain strain like this:
If you can't find a place to park in the parking lot, you'll have to find street parking. Emotion: stick out tongue
New2grammarWhat's the difference between 'is crowded' and 'is packed'?
1. crowded normally applies only to spaces full of people (a crowded theatre, bus, train, room); packed can apply to other things as well (packed together like sardines; vacuum packed foodstuffs; a packed suitcase)
2. packed is more slangy than crowded.
(My hesitation was about wall to wall -- not about crowded, which is perfectly fine. Maybe it's just me, but the only thing I associate with wall-to-wall is a wall-to-wall carpet.)
New2grammarI know novels use uncommon or weird phrases to grab attention or create special effects.
Yes, you have to be careful about this, but with a bit of caution you should be OK continuing your reading! Let's not throw out the baby with the bath water!

CJ
Thanks, CJ. It sounds funny but have no idea how it's related to the baby.
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