+0
His wife, Monique Olivier, 59, was convicted of complicity in four of the murders and sentenced to life in prison. She must serve at least 28 years before she can be considered for early release.

http://edition.cnn.com/2008/WORLD/europe/05/28/france.serialkiller.ap/index.html

Can I replace "can be considered for early release" with " is eligible for parole" without change ofmeaning?

Thanks!
Comments  
I don't know the European court system. You have to completely understand what parole is before you can decide whether that's an appropriate substitution.
New2grammar,
Parole is a process in which a parole review board made up of so-called experts will evaluate the parolee’s mental and psychological state as well as his behavioral pattern to see whether he is suitable for parole. Eligible for parole doesn't mean the same thing as sutible for parole. One may be eligible but if the borad deemed his condition unsutible, he will be denied until the next parole board evualation.
Some states require a felon convicted of violent crime to serve 85 % of the sentence before any eligibility of parole is granted. A parole does not equal to an automatic “release”. One must be very careful with judicial and legal terminology.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
I think I understand why my version may not be correct. If a convict is eligible for parole after a certain percentage of his/her sentence has been served, it means the convict will be RELEASED at the time though he/she will be supervised and if any conditions of the parole is violated, he/she will be put back in jail.

When I suggested the alternative version, I thought a parole was a process of CONSIDERING if a convict is suitable for early release as opposed to a guaranteed supervised release.

So If I change my version to "is considered for parole", that is, equating "early release" to "parole", would it be correct? For the sake of discussion, let's assume US/UK judicial system depending on which you're familiar with. My intention is to understand the every meaning of parole, say in the US judicial system. I don't expect your answer to be as accurate as a legal expert's as my intention is to understand its everyday English meaning instead of legal meaning, which is what I've been doing. I could be wrong but I feel that most people I speak to are worried/fear to ACCIDENTALLY disburse legal advice/opinions as it's I think illegal even though I seek casual answers. I'm not sure if it's a reasonable request to ask you to view my legal related questions as English questions.
I think I understand why my version may not be correct. If a convict is eligible for parole after a certain percentage of his/her sentence has been served, it means the convict will be RELEASED

No! I DON’T BELIEVE this is no correct. When the judge rendered the verdict from the Jurors and sentenced the felon to a jail term, depending on the serverity of the crime, a parole clause is ususally possible in the sentencing but the condition must be met. If there is no possibility of parole, he is behind bar for the rest of his life. Let’s just say a felon has served 10 of the 25 years sentence and he has been a model prisoner, a correctional officer has the power to make recommendation for an early parole. If this recommendation is apporved by the board, the prisoner is then “eligible” for parole In which he must satisfy the review process as I described earlier. After the Board deemed him suitable for early parole, then he is assigned to a parole officer whom he must report to at a certain time interval. If he violates any terms of the parole, he will be rearrested for further jail time.

at the time though he/she will be supervised and if any conditions of the parole is violated, he/she will be put back in jail.

When I suggested the alternative version, I thought a parole was a process of CONSIDERING if a convict is suitable for early release as opposed to a guaranteed supervised release.

So If I change my version to "is considered for parole", that is, equating "early release" to "parole", would it be correct? As I explained previously, that is not correct. Parole does not translate to “release”. Just remember that. Now if some one is “on parole”, he has already gone through the due process and satisfied the terms, and he must report to the parle offcier regularly and make sure he does violate the parole terms
She must serve at least 28 years before she can be considered for early release

Goodman, please allow me to give it another try. I hope, after reading your explanation and understandn it, this time I'm able to correctly reword the above. I have nothing against the original but as an English learner, I try to describe the same thing in a number of ways as part of the effort to improve my command of the language.

So, my version is:

She must serve at least 28 years before she can be eligible for parole.

If you think my version is still correct, please reword it to make it right.
Thank you.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
N2G,

No problem! In fact, this is a good attitude. I was also relentless with questions like you. I wouldn't rest until I understood the answers,

<<>>She must serve at least 28 years before she can be eligible for parole.

I think you got it!
Thanks, Goodman.