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Hello,
I'm Lithuanian and I have two questions. First one is about adjectives and participles. I had a task to do for my English, which required making adjectives out of verbs. When we were checking how we have done that, I'got into the dispute with my lecturer, whether a participle suits for this task. Well in Lithuanian, participles are also used as an adjectives, because they describe something, but it actually isn't an adjective and, for instance, if I marked in my state exam that "accumulated" is an adjective (Lithuanian word, of course), I would have definitely made a mistake. So IS participle an adjective, or does it just has the same function as an adjective.
My second question: if I make a noun out of a verb adding -ing, would that be correct. My lecturer kept saying that it isn't a noun, but I claimed otherwise. Which one of us was right this time?
Sorry if my English wasn't the best and thank you in advance.
Comments  
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I would have to see the specific sentences under discussion, but -ing verb form can be used as both adjectives and nouns:

The dancing bear is funny.
Dancing is a good form of exercise.

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There was no sentence, I just had to make an adjective and a noun out of the bare infinitive, so I can think of any meaning I like.
But understand me correctly - I want to know whether a participle LEGALLY can be an adjective. I know that it's used as an adjective, but can I say it actually IS an adjective. The same with "refurbishing" being a noun. Is it legally a noun?
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'Legally' has no meaning here. Grammarians may use whatever terms they wish... but they had better use terms that are acceptable to other grammarians. You cannot go to jail for calling an -ing verb form a gerund when it is used as a noun, but the term 'gerund' is disappearing nevertheless.

Modern grammarians are avoiding any name whatsoever except '-ing verb form', which then can serve as (1) a present participle ('We are refurbishing our flat'), (2) a noun ('Refurbishing is an expensive proposition') or (3) an adjective ('My refurbishing permit has expired').
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How can I put it then?.. Well, would that be a mistake in a state exam if I said that "refurbishing" from your second sentence is a noun?
If I said in the same exam that "ecouraged" in "we are even more encouraged now" is a past participle, but not a noun, would that be a mistake?
I don't like the idea, that there are now certain rules. Do you really can call a word whatever you like in whatever country you are from (sorry, I don't know that)? Emotion: smile There must be right or wrong. Here are two just yes or no questions:
Can a participle BE an adjective?
Can -ing form of a verb be a noun?
Thank you a lot in advance.
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How can I put it then?.. Well, would that be a mistake in a state exam if I said that "refurbishing" from your second sentence is a noun?-- 'Refurbishing' is a noun in that sentence.

If I said in the same exam that "ecouraged" in "we are even more encouraged now" is a past participle, but not a noun, would that be a mistake?-- 'Encouraged' could be considered either an adjective or a past participle in that sentence.
I don't like the idea, that there are now certain rules. Do you really can call a word whatever you like in whatever country you are from (sorry, I don't know that)?-- My statement was rhetorical. There must be right or wrong.-- Sometimes.
Here are two just yes or no questions:
Can a participle BE an adjective?-- It depends on the definition of 'participle'. If you use the term to mean an -ing or -ed form used as part of a verb phrase, then 'no'; if its definition is simply an -ing or -ed form derived from a verb stem, then 'yes'.
Can -ing form of a verb be a noun?-- Yes
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Thanks once again.
Most definitely it can - especially past participles! Few examples are of past participles as adjectives are:

A tired group.('tired' qualifies the noun group)

A hidden treasure was found by Aron.('hidden' qualifies the noun treasure)

The torn clothes were thrown away. ('torn' qualifies the noun clothes)