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Eating a hearty breakfast, we prepared for our long journey.

Why is the underlined part of the sentence a participle phrase?

'eating' is a non-finite verb, not a gerund, but the whole phrase may be considered as a verbal noun (gerund phrase), not a verbal adjective (participle phrase).


All the guests having arrived, the host started the party.
"All the guests" Is it the subject of "having arrived"? "having arrived" is a participle phrase and an adjectival phrase I think

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Being aware of my glaring inadequacy, I tried to work very hard.

"Being aware" I think it is a participle phrase and an adjective. Of genitive is a preposition and "my inadequacy" is is object of the preposition.
"Being aware of my glaring inadequacy" is also a participle phrase, if I am not mistaken.

what is "glaring's" lexical category?
I think "inadequacy" is the object of the possessive pronoun in singular first person, and glaring is the adjectival modifier of the object.
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Being aware of my inadequacy being glaring, I tried to work hard.
Here, being glaring is the objective complement, is it? Also, It is a participle. Glaring is an disjunct and has a different syntactical role from that one when it precedes inadequacy.
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Honestly, the recent measures introduced by the the local government in Myseria seems too harsh, with poor people paying taxes almost more than their income.

"honestly" is an adverbial, and it is also a disjunct, expressing the writer's attitude.
"the recent measures" subject
"recent" and "Myseria" set the scene of the action. So they are adjuncts.
"introduced by the the local government" participle phrase and 'introduced' is a participle.
"
in Myseria" is it an adjectival complement besides being a prep phrase?
"seems" is a linking verb (copula)
what is "too"?
"with poor people paying taxes almost more than their income" adverbial, prep phrase.
"almost more than their income" objective complement?

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Comments  
Find the verbs.

<Eating a hearty breakfast, we prepared for our long journey.>

What do you see as the verb for the subject there?

Here too:

Running down the street, Alicia tripped and fell.

What are the verbs for the subject there, IYO?
Any meaning differences between the two sentences of each group? It seems to me that they're the same meaning. I'd like to take these participles (present/past) as adverbials , but haven't found any supporting comments yet.

1.1 <Eating a hearty breakfast, we prepared for our long journey.>

1.2 While we are eating a hearty breakfast, we prepared for our long journey.

2.1 Running down the street, Alicia tripped and fell.

2.2 While she was running down the street, Alicia tripped and fell.

3.1 Eaten a hearty breakfast, we prepared for our long journey

3.2 We prepared for our long journey, after had eaten a hearty breakfast
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MilkyFind the verbs.

<Eating a hearty breakfast, we prepared for our long journey.>

What do you see as the verb for the subject there?

Here too:

Running down the street, Alicia tripped and fell.

What are the verbs for the subject there, IYO?

Hi Milky,

"What do you see as the verb for the subject there?" Prepared and tripped.
I hope this time we agreeEmotion: wink
<Hi Milky,

"What do you see as the verb for the subject there?" Prepared and tripped.
I hope this time we agree>


If you add "fell", we agree.

NB

<Here, being glaring is the objective complement, isn't it? >
MapleAny meaning differences between the two sentences of each group? It seems to me that they're the same meaning. I'd like to take these participles (present/past) as adverbial modifiers, but haven't found any supporting comments yet.

1.1 <Eating a hearty breakfast, we prepared for our long journey.>

1.2 While we are eating a hearty breakfast, we prepared for our long journey.

2.1 Running down the street, Alicia tripped and fell.

2.2 While she "was running" ( down the street, Alicia tripped and fell. This is a finite phrase, thus not verbal.

3.1 Eaten!!!Eating or having eaten a hearty breakfast, we prepared for our long journey

3.2 We prepared for our long journey, after had eaten a hearty breakfast


2.2 "While she "was running" down the street, Alicia tripped and fell." This is a finite phrase, thus not verbal.

3.1 Eaten!!!Eating or having eaten a hearty breakfast, we prepared for our long journey

Hello Maple,

Thank you for answering.
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Thank you for your correction, it should be "having eaten"

3.1 Having eaten a hearty breakfast, we prepared for our long journey.

3.2 We prepared for our long journey, after had eaten a hearty breakfast.

4.1 Beaten in the face, the little girl cried and ran home.

4.2 The little girl cried and ran home after she had been beaten in the face.
<

1.1 <Eating a hearty breakfast, we prepared for our long journey.>

1.2 While we are eating a hearty breakfast, we prepared for our long journey.>

No, that's:

After eating a hearty breakfast.../after we had eaten a hearty breakfast...
I made those examples to say those "verbal"'s function could be totally substituted with (ha ha) those clauses. So why don't we say they both function as adverbials?
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