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Being watching TV, I fell asleep.

Do you avoid using 'Being' in the front of a sentence as a participle phrase even though it's grammatically correct?

Will you say 'While watching TV, I fell asleep?' or eles instead?

One more question.

Finished his homework, Roger started playing computer games.

Will you not say like that? and will say like 'After Roger finished his homework, he started playinig computer games?'
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Do you avoid using 'Being' in the front of a sentence as a participle phrase even though it's grammatically correct?-- It is not grammatical 'correct' in that it is not in use. No native speaker would say, write or think that.

Will you say 'While watching TV, I fell asleep?' or eles instead'-- Yes.

Finished his homework, Roger started playing computer games.Will you not say like that?- No. 'Finished with his homework' is OK.

and will say like 'After Roger finished his homework, he started playinig computer games?'- That is OK, too.
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Thank you very much.

I become very confused.

I thought (or someone/books taught me) that the way to change a sentence into a paticiple sentence is omit the subject and transform the verb in the main clause. Q1) Is it correct?

The example I brought is a good example of it.

You said:

Finished his homework, Roger started playing computer games.Will you not say like that?- No. 1.'Finished with his homework' is OK.

and will say like 2. 'After Roger finished his homework, he started playinig computer games?'- That is OK, too.

I wonder why it there is 'with,' and no 'with' in 2. As I apply the rule to make a participle sentence, nothing is added. (or the rule I brought is wrong.) Q2) Is it explicable or it is just as it is?
I cannot vouch for or deny many of these 'assembly rules' that appear in ESL texts, since my English does not function that way. I don't think it is that simple, however (because it never is).

'-Ed' participles in nonfinite clauses reflect a passive voice form, not an active voice form, so that I can say these:

After he was finished with his homework, he...
Finished with his homework, he...

The '-ed' verb is adjectival in form.

You cannot do that with the active verb. You can, on the other hand, do itwith an '-ing' nonfinite clause:

After he finished his homework, he...
Finishing his homework, he...

The '-ing' verb remains verbal in form.
Wow, your explanation is crystal clearEmotion: big smile

A passive sentence is with -ed and an active sentence is with -ing (remained a verb state)

So another example I brought ''While watching TV, I fell asleep.' can be transformed into a participle sentence like 'Watching TV, I fell asleep.' Right? and not 'Being watching TV, I fell asleep.'
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Right.

But I'm not sure that what I wrote always holds true; it just came to mind.
Hi Mister Micawber,

I'd like to ask if we can say the following. I found these in an excerise book.

After I had finished my breakfast, I went out for a walk.

1. Can I say: Having finished my breakfast, I went out for a walk?

2. Can I say: After I finished my breakfast, I went out for a walk?

3. Does that mean "After I was finished with my breakfast, I went out for a walk" have the same meaning "After I finished my breakfast, I went out for a walk"?

Thank you.

Tinanam
After I (had) finished my breakfast, I went out for a walk.

1. Can I say: Having finished my breakfast, I went out for a walk?-- Yes

2. Can I say: After I finished my breakfast, I went out for a walk?-- Yes

3. Does that mean "After I was finished with my breakfast, I went out for a walk" has the same meaning as "After I finished my breakfast, I went out for a walk"?- - Yes.
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Hi Mister Micawber,

Thank you for answering and correcting my sentence question.

Have a great day

Tinanam
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