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I've stumbled upon an interesting article on a web site that talked about words like assuming, considering, etc., labeling them "participle prepositions" on the basis that they were originally present participles but because of wide use have become acceptable as prepositions.

I could not find another source concerning this matter.
Considering that you’re here, maybe you can clear up something for me.

Although concerning in the first example is clearly a preposition, considering in the second seems to be a subordinating conjunction. May I please have your opinion? What would you call it?

Spar
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I would certainly call "considering" a preposition in your example.


The structural difference between "considering" and "concerning" is that the latter takes an NP complement, whereas "considering" can also take a content clause, as can be seen in your examples.


Subordinators ("that", "for", "to", "whether" and "if") are merely grammatical markers of subordination, whereas preps function as 'heads' of the expressions they introduce. "Concerning" and "considering" are not markers of subordination; they have independent meanings - "considering" in your example can be roughly glossed as "in view of the fact".


Further, unlike subordinators, preps are not themselves part of the subordinate clause. In your "considering" example, the subordinate clause is just "that you're here".


There are a few other preps that are homonymous with present participles such as "according", "regarding", "following", as well as a few that derive from past participles such as "given", "granted", "provided", "gone".


BillJ

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We're talking about "Considering that you’re here, maybe you can clear up something for me."

"Considering" is an inflected verb here, and "that you're here" is its grammatical object. "Considering that you're here" as a whole is a subordinate clause with regard to the main clause "Maybe you can clear up something for me." The subordinate clause functions like an adverb in the main clause. It is an "adverbial clause."

Considering can act both as a preposition and conjunction. The example given here is a conjunction. In the sentence " She is very active, considering her age", considering is a preposition.
http://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/considering

Jahir

Considering can act both as a preposition and conjunction. The example given here is a conjunction. In the sentence " She is very active, considering her age", considering is a preposition.
http://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/considering

I don't agree. Dictionaries are not to be trusted when it comes to grammar. There is no reason to distinguish two categories for "considering" according as its complement is an NP or a content clause.

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