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Hi,
I've read in my text book that the definite article is used before the names of passes, e.g "the Belkave Pass" but it also reads that there are some exceptions to this rule. Unfortunately only one exception is given: "They visited Deadman Pass and Suicide Pass".
I am sure that there must be other exceptions. Could you give me some examples? I would be very grateful.

Best wishes
Magda
Comments  
This is most likely a matter of local usage. I believe you will have to use a search engine like Google to research any particular case if the occasion arises. I suspect that passes that are named after animals (e.g., Black Bear Pass) are more likely to be used without the definite article, but I have no proof of it.
I also believe that the examples given in your text are fictitious and were invented merely to show how such a structure would occur without the definite article.

CJ
Oh, that's surprising! On the other hand, this book is slightly puzzling. I've read a part on waterfalls and it says that with waterfalls the definite article is always used. I went through a list of (water)falls in Wikipedia and to my surprise I found too many examples where a waterfall wasn't preceeded by the article, e.g. Ouzoud Waterfalls, Murchison Falls, Kalambo Falls to mention a few. Emotion: surprise Emotion: rolleyes Emotion: angry
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Now that is surprising. We don't go to see the Niagara Falls here in the U.S. We go to see Niagara Falls!

CJ
I am certain that this book keeps more surprises but I am in no positon to judge Emotion: smile .
Magda,

You have the perfect set-up here to learn a nice idiom.

this book keeps more surprises is written more idiomatically as this book has more surprises in store. Emotion: smile

CJ
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CalifJimMagda,

You have the perfect set-up here to learn a nice idiom.

this book keeps more surprises is written more idiomatically as this book has more surprises in store. Emotion: smile

CJ

Calif Jim,

apart from the idiom I have also learnt what "set-up" means Emotion: smile.