+0

Hi

Could you help me with this?

I came across these sentences while I was learning about passive voice.

I avoid seeing him.

He avoids being seen.

I don't mind teaching her.

She doesn't mind being taught.


My question

Do the sentences in passive voice sound all right in line with their active equivalents?

I somehow feel that the passive voice with the action verbs—"avoids" and "doesn't mind"—placed after the objects("him" and "her") are unnecessarily tagging them as actors.

Please give your views.

1 2
Comments  (Page 2) 
GPY"will be being done" is theoretically possible but feels pretty horrible. I recommend that you avoid it.

Noted. Thank you.

GPYYou added "by" for no apparent reason.

It was an oversight.

vsureshIn the original passive voice sentences( the ones I posted), I felt meaning of the active was not conveyed in passive.(I avoid seeing him. He avoids being seen me) ??While in active voice "him" is the object, in the passive where it should be again passive. But, "He avoids being seen me" sounded odd to meEven in the second sentence, the active voice clearly states she does not do anything. But, the passive begins "She doesn't mind..."

That's because you were taking the object of the subordinate clause and promoting it to subject of the matrix clause, cf.

[1] I avoid [seeing him].

[2] He avoids [being seen].

[3] I avoid [being seen by him].

The passive counterpart of [1] is [3] not [2].

The important thing here is that in [1] "him" is object of "seeing" in the bracketed subordinate clause. It should not be promoted to subject of the matrix clause, as in [2]. The passivisation should take place in the subordinate clause, while "I" remains subject of the matrix clause, as in [3].

If you promote the subordinate object in [1] to subject of the matrix clause, you change the meaning completely, since the covert (understood) subject of the subordinate clause in [2] is "he" (or "him"), when it should be "I" (or "me") as in [3].

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
BillJ[1] I avoid [seeing him].[2] He avoids [being seen].[3] I avoid [being seen by him].The passive counterpart of the active [1] is [3] not [2].The important thing here is that in [1] "him" is object of "seeing" in the bracketed subordinate clause. It should not be promoted to subject of the matrix clause, as in [2]. The passivisation should take place in the subordinate clause, while "I" remains subject of the matrix clause, as in [3].If you promote the object in [1] to subject of the matrix clause, you change the meaning completely, since the covert (understood) subject of the subordinate clause in [2] is "he" (or "him"), when it should be "I" (or "me") as in [3].

Got it, BillJ. Thank you very much.

 AlpheccaStars's reply was promoted to an answer.

I went through them.

Thank you, AlpheccaStars.

Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies