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I feel if a gerund is in passive form, a good (correct?) form to use is a possessive like 'his' or 'her' rather than an object pronoun like 'him' or 'her'. Is that just a thought of that can hold no water?

eg.
I feel him being (able to be) in my birthday party is good.
Not good: I feel his being (able to be be) in my birthday party is good.

But, if the gerund is in active form, I feel the opposite.

eg.
I applaud his coming back to our team and playing for us.
Not good: I applaud him coming back to our team and playing for us.
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AnonymousIs that just a thought of that can hold no water?
I'm afraid so. Emotion: crying
It is often said that only the possessive form is correct, but in reality you'll find the possessive and the objective forms in free variation. It is often more a matter of the preceding verb. Some seem to go with the possessive more often; some, with the objective; others, with either, depending on emphasis.
It's not clear to me what you mean by a passive and an active gerund, either.
(By the way, it's at my birthday party, not in my birthday party. Emotion: smile )
CJ
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example for passive gerund ; I don't like being interrupted

passive
The gerund of a transitive verb has the following four forms:-

ACTIVE PASSIVE

Present : writing Present : being written

Perfect : having written Perfect : having been written

I stopped writing to speak to him. I could not help being impressed.

He denied having written such a letter. The safe shows no signs of having been tiuched.