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I'd like to confirm what I have been thinking.

The passive voice.

(1) He was thought of.

(2) He was thought about.

I feel that (1) should be incorrect, whereas (2) should be correct.

Am I wrong?
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PructusI'd like to confirm what I have been thinking.
(1) He was thought of.
(2) He was thought about.
I feel that (1) should be incorrect, whereas (2) should be correct.
Am I wrong?
Somehow I don't use "think about a person". So to me such a sentence like "He was thought about to be a terrorist" or "He was thought about as a terrorist" sounds weird. But I might be wrong as usual.

paco

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YoHfMmm... I'd pick nr.1 as the most common one... For instance:

He was thought of being a killer

or otherwise:

He was thought to be a killer

Hello Yo

The second of these is correct; but the first should be "He was thought of as being a killer".

MrP
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Comments  
Mmm... I'd pick nr.1 as the most common one... For instance:

He was thought of being a killer

or otherwise:

He was thought to be a killer
There is no great difference between the two.
If one is correct, the other is correct.
There may be rare circumstances in which either might be used in a conversation.

CJ
 paco2004's reply was promoted to an answer.
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The same goes for me... I usually prefer not to use "think about a person" and change it in something better-sounding...

[Y]
 MrPedantic's reply was promoted to an answer.