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Hello,

Is it possible to use past simple in places where I wrote both tenses?

Last night, while I was doing my homework, Angela (call) called. She said she call was calling //called me on her cell phone from her biology classroom at UCLA. I asked her if she was waiting///waited for class, but she said that the professor was at the front of the hall lecturing while she was talking to me.//Past simple is wrong here, I think//
I couldn't believe she (make) was making///made a phone call during the lecture. I asked what was going on.

What does it mean 'to wait for class?'
Thanks
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Last night, while I was doing my homework, Angela called. She said she was calling me on her cell phone from her biology classroom at UCLA. I asked her if she was waiting for class, but she said that the professor was at the front of the hall lecturing while she was talking to me.
I couldn't believe she was making a phone call during the lecture. I asked what was going on.

Is it possible to use past simple in places where I wrote both tenses?-- No. The above are the correct choices. Simple past is possible in the last instance only (she was making / she made), but it is not a good choice.

What does it mean 'to wait for class?'-— As Surfer said.
Comments  
Nina_NiaHello,
Is it possible to use past simple in places where I wrote both tenses?
Yes, and it's the better choice there.
Nina_Nia//Past simple is wrong here, I think//
No, not really. However, the past continuous is the expected tense there.
Nina_NiaWhat does it mean 'to wait for class?'
The free dictionary.com gives the following meaning of the word class (http://www.thefreedictionary.com/class ):

..
c. A group of students who meet at a regularly scheduled time to study the same subject.
d. The period during which such a group meets: had to stay after class.

So , obviously, to wait for class means to wait for such period to begin.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
 Mister Micawber's reply was promoted to an answer.
SurferYes, and it's the better choice there.
I just noticed my mistake now, I didn't read your question carefully; I meant the past continuous there.
Sorry.