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Hi everyone. I've been thinking of how to say the following idea correctly

I had ordered a parcel but they hadn't been delivering it for long.

I had ordered a parcel but they wasn't delivering it for long./ I wasn't being delivered it for long.

Is at least one of them correct or both of them are not? Thanks in advance

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Those are both incorrect, and it is somewhat hard to understand exactly what you are trying to say. You may possibly mean one of these:

I've ordered a ~ but it still hasn't arrived / they still haven't delivered it. (as of now)
I'd ordered a ~ but it still hadn't arrived / they still hadn't delivered it. (as of some time in the past)

We don't normally perceive that we order a parcel. We perceive that we order the item inside the parcel. You can, however, say e.g.:

I'm expecting a parcel, but it hasn't arrived.

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I meant that I ordered it, but I could not get it for a long time, the question was how to express this duration correctly. Sorry for being unclear.

Derevenshina

I meant that I ordered it, but I could not get it for a long time, the question was how to express this duration correctly. Sorry for being unclear.

Have you now received it, or are you still waiting?

I ordered it and had been waiting for some time. I have it now, I'm just trying to understand whether past continuous or past perfect continuous have to be used.

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Derevenshina

I ordered it and had been waiting for some time. I have it now, I'm just trying to understand whether past continuous or past perfect continuous have to be used.

In this context you would not use a continuous tense of the verb "deliver". You can say e.g.:

I ordered a new part but they took a long time to deliver it. (assuming it is understood from context who "they" refers to)
I ordered a new part but it took a long time to arrive.

There is no need to use the past perfect if you are talking from the viewpoint of now. The past perfect would be used e.g. in this case:

It was April 2018, and my car was still off the road. I had ordered the part I needed three weeks earlier, but it still hadn't arrived.