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I know that the past of "mus"t is" had to",what about the past of "mustn't",is it" hadn't to" or "didn't have to" ?As far as I know " hadn't to " means there was no obligation to do something.Examples:

I haven't to/I don't have to do my homework = I'm not obliged to do it

I hadn't to do my homework = I wasn't obliged to do it

Are these sentences correct ?
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For this meaning of have, do is needed:

I don't have to do my homework.
I didn't have to do my homework.
Do you have to do your homework?
Did you have to do your homework?

CB
Present=have to,negative= don't have to,past = had to,past negative = didn't have to

Present = must,negative = mustn't,past = had to,what about past negative ?,is it didn't have to also?

I found in a book these examples:

You must clean the house = obligation in the present

You mustn't clean the house = obligation not to do the cleaning

You had to clean the house = obligation in the past

You weren't allowed to clean the house = you were obliged not to do the cleaning(can we say,you didn't have to clean the house ?)
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everlastinghope You weren't allowed to clean the house = you were obliged not to do the cleaning(can we say,you didn't have to clean the house ?)

The meaning is completely different, as discussed above.

"You didn't have to do it" means that you had no obligation.
It doesn't mean that you weren't allowed to do it.

I know that the past of "mus"t is" had to",

"had to" is the past of "have to."
"mustn't" doesn't have a past, nor does "must."
Avangi
"mustn't" doesn't have a past, nor does "must."


Try to visit this website : http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=32031 where it's said that the past of "must" is had to.

Also, http://www.usingenglish.com/poll/9.html where someone wrote "If you study German you will find that modal verbs such as these still retain the ability to be used in past tense with a different verbal suffix .. "Ich muss" translates to English as "I must" perfectly, but "Ich musste" can now only translate as "I had to" instead of "I musted"."

However,no one spoke about the past negative of "mustn't",but I found as I said before in an English Grammar Book this example : I mustn't do the cleaning;Past I wasn't allowed to do the cleaning.So,is it correct to say " I didn't have to"instead of "wasn't allowed" ?
Of course there's a way to say it, but it seems absurd to me to call A the past tense of B when they're not even derived from the same word. Any fool can write a book.

So,is it correct to say " I didn't have to"instead of "wasn't allowed" ?

Not if you wish to retain the same meaning!!!

The first one means you have no obligation at all.

The second one means you're obligated not to do it.
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everlastinghopeSo,is it correct to say " I didn't have to"instead of "wasn't allowed" ?
No. These two mean completely different things.

When you negate must, you negate the following proposition. An obligation or requirement still exists.

You must [stop at a red light]. (obligation: to do something)

You must [not drive through a red light]. (obligation: not to do something, to refrain from doing something)
must not: You have an obligation to refrain from driving through a red light.

When you negate have to, you negate the obligation or requirement.

You [have to] stop at a red light. (obligation: to do something)

You [don't have to] stop at a green light. (no obligation, freedom from the requirement to do something)
don't have to: You don't have any obligation to stop at a green light.

_____________

Note the following equivalents.

You have to leave. = You must leave. = You must not stay. = You [may not / cannot] stay.

You have to stay. = You must stay. = You must not leave. = You [may not / cannot] leave.

You don't have to leave. = You [may / can] stay (if you wish).

You don't have to stay. = You [may / can] leave (if you wish).

I had to leave. = I couldn't stay. = I was not allowed to stay.

I had to stay. = I couldn't leave. = I was not allowed to leave.
I didn't have to leave. = I could have stayed. = I was allowed to stay.
I didn't have to stay. = I could have left. = I was allowed to leave.

CJ
I mustn't do the cleaning;Past I wasn't allowed to do the cleaning. - everlastinghope

No one is saying that it's impossible to express "mustn't" in the past tense.
But it's nonsense to say that "I wasn't allowed to do the cleaning" is the past tense of "I mustn't do the cleaning."
It's too confusing and I'm still not conviced because what drives me mad,is to find one thing in a book ( New Headway),and another thing in some websites.

Thanks for you all,anyway.
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