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Hello,
is this passive v3/past perfect ?

"...you feel valued and accepted by those around you.."

Thanks
Comments  
Nothing that complicated. It's just a "verb of sense" followed by two adjective complements. The verb "to feel" is used in simple present tense. The adjectives in this case are both past participles (verbals), which may be what threw you off.

You are clever and wise. (Simple present, verb "to be," two adjective complements.)

Edit. "Valued" is also listed in the dictionary as an adjective in its own right. This is sometimes the case with participles. Ha! So is "accepted."
sunsailis this passive v3/past perfect ?
No, because there is no had.

Past perfect is:

had valued
had accepted


Passive past perfect is:

had been valued
had been accepted


CJ
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Hello,
Does it have passive or active meaning?

It sounds like when I say " I feel valued"
I feel as if I have been valued by others.

Thanks
In the sense that everything you feel is due to stimuli coming in "passively" from the outside, not due to anything you do as an active agent, then yes, it's "passive", but it's not truly passive in the grammatical sense. Emotion: smile

CJ
sunsailDoes it have passive or active meaning?

It sounds like when I say " I feel valued"
I feel as if I have been valued by others.
That's the beauty of verbals as adjectives. They feel like verbs. But they're not. Active and passive don't apply.

There have been some special rules and categories dealing with this, and I don't know which ones are accepted by whom.

The traditional view is that only the verb "to be" is used in forming the passive voice.

When you say, "I am valued," since "to value" is a transitive verb, this sentence may be taken as an example of passive voice. "I was valued" works the same way as "I was tasered."

But it's just as grammatically correct to take it as "to be" + adjective. "I am valued" works the same as "I am clever." "Clever" is not a verbal - just an adjective.

Edit. Reading Jim's post on this, I'll bow to his view. Surely, a person who feels valued is not the actor, but the recipient of the action, if action there be.
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Hello,
Well,thanks for brief explanation,because I m making some translations,this is helpful for me.can I say that transitive verbs(which need an object) can be adjectives when they are in past perfect format(basically passive)
Thanks
That's sort of an oversimplification. What you call (past perfect format) is called "the past participle." It's used for several things, one of which is in forming the past perfect tense, together with the auxilliary verb, "had."

It's also used in forming the passive voice, together with the auxilliary verb "to be" (am, is, was, etc.). Only transitive verbs may be used in the passive voice.

It's also used as an adjective.

It's also used at the "head" of a participial phrase, which has various uses.
sunsailcan I say that transitive verbs(which need an object) can be adjectives when they are in past perfect format(basically passive)
You are confusing the past perfect tense with the past participle form.

Infinitive: to know
Past participle: known

Past Perfect Tense: had known

The past participles of many verbs can be used as adjectives, especially after linking verbs, and they often are:

The puppy is lost.
This seat is taken.
These facts are known to all.
That window has been closed all day.
Mary was interested in buying the magazine.
Peter and Sally have been married for three years.
The situation was much more complicated than anyone had predicted.


CJ
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