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i know about "past perfect tense" and "past perfect continues tense".

past perfect = had + past participle of verb
past perfect continues tense = had + been + 'ing' of verb

that is my all knowledge about these two above tense

A problem raised when i was going through a exercise in grammar book. exercise is as follow.

MAKE CORRECT BELOW SENTENCE BY PUTTING APPROPRIATE VERB.

Q) when i met her last year, she <u>was married</u> for three years.
#1-MY ANSWER) when i met her last year, she had married for three years.
#2-OR) when i met her last year, she had been marrying for three years.

my both above assumption were wrong, right answer is..
#3-RIGHT ANS.) when i met her last year, she had been married for three years.

i know #2 is wrong because marriage is not such process that can be continue through three years. but structure of #3 sentence (which is correct) is out of my syllabus. "had+been+past-participle-of-verb", which tense it is? let me know if there more example of this type.
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DSO AMRELI i know about "past perfect tense" and "past perfect continues tense".past perfect = had + past participle of verbpast perfect continues tense = had + been + 'ing' of verbthat is my all knowledge about these two above tenseA problem raised when i was going through a exercise in grammar book. exercise is as follow.MAKE CORRECT BELOW SENTENCE BY PUTTING APPROPRIATE VERB. Q) when i met her last year, she was married for three years.#1-MY ANSWER) when i met her last year, she had married for three years.#2-OR) when i met her last year, she had been marrying for three years.my both above assumption were wrong, right answer is..#3-RIGHT ANS.) when i met her last year, she had been married for three years.i know #2 is wrong because marriage is not such process that can be continue through three years. but structure of #3 sentence (which is correct) is out of my syllabus. "had+been+past-participle-of-verb", which tense it is? let me know if there more example of this type.
Hi,

Had+been+married = past perfect simple tense.

This tense is used to say that something had happened or had been going on (for a while) before something else happened.

She got married in 1997. (first event)
I met her in 2000. (second event)

When I met her in 2000, she had been married for three years. (that is, from 1997-2000, 3 years)

What may have caused your confusion is the construction of to be married, which appears to contain two verbs, so to speak, except that married behaves like an adjective rather than a verb. She is married. The married woman. A litte extra confusing is that married appears to have the form of a past participle.

You need to distinguish between:

to marry / to get married = the act of marrying someone (the day or ceremony itself).

AND

to be married = spending your life together with one or various other people under a contractual agreement through the act of marrying.

Hope this helps.

DJB
Comments  
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Exactly. so its not passive. it is so genius of you that you caught the marry-be-marry problem and distinguished it. thank you so much for your precious reply.
Thank u so much for your nice explanation. It help me alot.