1 2
CalifJim
Fandorinsimple conversion according to the sequence of tenses
Can you specify further? How about giving the original and the converted version? Are you recommending something like this?

He has known since he heard it from his sister. >
He had known since he had heard it from his sister.

CJ
Hey, Jim. Yes, you're right. It is just easier for me to remember, I guess. And there is no point to convert the clause after since, since it is past the event specified before as you pointed out. Thank you anyway. =)
“But it was two years since I had ridden a horse”. This is interesting.

But "it had been two years since I rode a horse" will do as well, won't it?
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
FandorinHey, Jim. Yes, you're right. It is just easier for me to remember, I guess. And there is no point to convert the clause after since, since it is past the event specified before as you pointed out. Thank you anyway. =)
OK. Emotion: smile

Just a small thing: It's no point in ...-ing, not no point to .... There's no point in converting the clause ...

CJ
Fandorin“But it was two years since I had ridden a horse”. This is interesting.
But "it had been two years since I rode a horse" will do as well, won't it?
Well, yes, I suppose it would do as well. The oddities of English! Emotion: smile

CJ
Rusty I have become without much practice. And final accord is the sentence I have found in Swan's book.

"You have drunk about ten cups of teas since you've been sitting here". I understand that "his sitting" is still very much in process at the moment the statement is made but still. Would you use it somewhen or I had better stick to the rules outlined above?
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Tea, that is.
FandorinYou have drunk about ten cups of tea since you've been sitting here.
Yes. I would use it. I would automatically understand it as "during the time you've been sitting here". Does that mean we are dealing with a slightly different definition of "since"? I don't know. Maybe we could call it a slightly different usage.

CJ
Thanks. I get it now.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.