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This sounds so inane but referencing the above: is it past tense: dragged, present tense: drag and future tense 'drag?'..a friend says 'I drug the stuff home' and they are saying that is the correct use..I KNOW it isn't but they need to say it in writing??????

I hear my husband use the following sentence: I left him do it...instead of I let him do it...he says the words mean the same thing...I think that isn't so...they are not the same. Has anyone else heard this before (besides people from Pittsburgh?)???

Thanks
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Comments  (Page 3) 
GuestThis sounds so inane but referencing the above: is it past tense: dragged, present tense: drag and future tense 'drag?'..a friend says 'I drug the stuff home' and they are saying that is the correct use..I KNOW it isn't but they need to say it in writing??????
Thanks

If you're taking a test or writing a formal paper, use dragged since it is accepted across all regions.

Otherwise, if you use dragged instead of drug you're just a weakling ... you've changed a strong verb to a weak verb. Pun intended.

Use drug and be proud!

Interesting enough, Oxford English Dictionary says that the verb to drag was not known before the 15th century. Now I don't know how that can be since it obviously (to me) comes from the OE verb dragan.

The verb to drug (meaning to drag) shows up in literature to c1250 in Lofsong Ure Lefdi.

If nothing else, then the use of "drug" as the past tense of drag represents a fusion of two separate words that also has produced pairs like go-went (the original past tense of go changed to "went" which was the past tense of "to wend" and be-was. However, I think it was simply a split in pronunciation and thus a vowel change due to a lack of standards since English had been superseded by Norman French and Latin.

I can't tell when people started using dragged instead of drug (drog) for the past tense ... But obviously it was still common enough when people settled in the US. Regardless coming out of OE, it was a strong verb and, IMO, should still be one in Modern English.

I am glad that OED at least acknowledges that drug also occurs as a past tense and past participle form of drag v. tho is lists it as nonstandard and regional use (especially U.S. regional (southern and Midland)).

Germanic ablaut formation, OE dragan is a cognate to German tragen, past tense: trug.

OE dragan

dragan Strong sv/t6, to drag, draw

3rd pres drægð;*** past drog/on***; ptp gedragen

sv/i6 to draw oneself, to draw, go protract

Verb

Present Tense

ic/I dræge

þu/thou drægest

he/hit/heo he/it/she drægeþ

we/ge/hie we/ye/they drægaþ

Preterite Tense

ic i dróg

þu/thou dróge

he/hit/heo he/it/she dróg

we/ge/hie we/ye/they drógon

This is really helpful! Thanks alot.
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I agree 100%.It irks me to hear so many people say DRUG when they mean DRAGGED. I here cops and firemen say it and they have a college education or they couldn't have that job! What bothers me most is it seems to be accepted. Apperently the education system in the US sucks. What happened?
Growing up in New York, I remember almost everyone using the word "left" for the word "let".
having read all the questions on this forum regarding this subject; which is right, dragged or drug? I am English, I grew up learning English and know no other language. English is MY language, spoken in my homeland, England. As Americans speak our language, it would be gratifying to hear it spoken correctly and to this end, I can assure those interested, that with certainty the past participle of drag is dragged. it is not 'drug' or 'drugged' as so often heard spoken by Americans on television in this country. We do NOT use 'drug' unless talking about medicines. We do not use 'left' in place of 'let' either, this seems to make no sense at all! There are many explanations and reasons for the use of 'drug' in the context of dragging, but none of them are correct, it is simply not done in England, where unarguably correctly pronounced, grammatical English is spoken. thank you.
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"drug" as a past form of "drag" is nonstandard, chiefly used in Southern American English dialects.