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I have got a confussion about the difference of that two tenses.

I will explain it in fictional stories;

1) I am waiting for a friend to drink beer. And he is coming.

- Is our beer coming?
+ No, I haven't ordered it.

I think present perfect is true here.

2) The salesman brings us two glasses of orange juice. However i didn't want anything.

- I haven't ordered these. ( I think present perfect tense is OK. I mean "they are not mine" , related to present.)

3) I am going to meet someone, when I am in the restaurant my friend is drinking something and he asks me to pay. But I will not.

- I haven't ordered this. (I think that one is true too. I mean "it is not mine, and I am not paying", related to present. But I am not sure about that)

---Are three of them true? Do you think there is a wrong one, and past simple (I didn't order) must be used ?---

I would love this question to be answered with British English rules (not American)
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---Are three of them true? Do you think there is a wrong one, and past simple (I didn't order) must be used ?--- Both present perfect and simple past are commonly used by native speakers on both sides of the Atlantic in all 3 cases. All happened in the past (the order or non-order) and all appear in the present. It depends only on the speaker's viewpoint at the moment.
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Mister Micawber---Are three of them true? Do you think there is a wrong one, and past simple (I didn't order) must be used ?--- Both present perfect and simple past are commonly used by native speakers on both sides of the Atlantic in all 3 cases. All happened in the past (the order or non-order) and all appear in the present. It depends only on the speaker's viewpoint at the moment.

What do you mean with the viewpoint? Could you possibly explane it more?
Viewpoint: how the speaker sees the event-- as occurring in the past or as an effect on the present.
Then, in my examples present perfect is OK in my opinion. Because I mean " Beer is not coming -1-" and "They are not mine 2 and 3 . In summary I want to point on the effect.

Am I right?

If yes, my question is over and thank you very much for your help and symphaty.
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Both present perfect and simple past are commonly used in those sentences.
OK. I have got the main idea. Thanks for your help.
I have got more confussions. I will ask my questions through fictional stories again.

1)

"A" has a lot of work to do in this week. His brother wanted to visit him, he refused that but his brother came and B saw him with A. A and B are having a chat.

B: Why are you angry?
A: I asked him not to come (Past Simple)

I think past simple is the right one but I cannot explain the reason clearly. Can he say " I have asked him not to come (Does that sentence include the meaning "so I am angry)

2)

B and C had an arguement and they do not want to see each other. A invites B to a party;

B: C will be there too probably, so I won't be there.
A: Don't worry, I have asked him not to come (Present Perfect)

I think present perfect is true. Because the sentence has the meaning "He is asked not to come now, and will not be there". Am I right?

3) That is the last story but that one is the one which makes me confused most.

A loves a girl and calls her princess, B and the girl meets. Then B says his opinions about the girl

B: Why do you call her princess, is she beautiful enough to deserve that?

A's possible answers:

- I haven't named her princess because of her physical beauty (I think that one is true, because the sentence has a meaning related to present: "I call her princess because of her other things.")

- I haven't called her princess because of her physical beauty ( That means "until now", so it is true too in my opinion)

- I haven't started to call her princess because of her physical beauty ( What do you think about that? Is that wrong? Does it reffer to the first time he had ever called her princess?)

------

If you can check my opinions and explain the reasons, I will be pleased so much.

It is really like a nightmare to learn the difference between these two tenses.

Thanks to the everyone who will show interest.

P.S : Could you possibly use British English rules again please?
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White_StormP.S : Could you possibly use British English rules again please?

I cannot edit my message but I have pulled back this request. It doesn't have to be answered through "British English" rules anymore
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