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I'm pretty curious about 1 think in Past Simple and it's result. When we are talking with somebody that he bought something or caught something or anything else but the result is that he remember it (Present Perfect). So what about Past ? Do we want to tell only the action but the result of remembering it or getting informed vanish ? Or I just don't understand here something ?

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E.g.:

1. He bought a car.
2. He has bought a car.

Both talk about a past purchase, but (2) has extra connotations that the purchase was recent and is of present relevance (he has the car now; maybe he's just told you about it, or you've just seen it, etc.).

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Xenon02 remembering

Any consideration regarding remembering the action applies equally to the past and the present perfect. If you can't remember the action, you can't talk about it at all, no matter which tense you use.

Xenon02 result

Considering the result of an action is equally unhelpful. Most actions have results, so nothing about the result can be used to guide us in the choice between past and present perfect.

Some explanations of the present perfect include the idea of 'result', but frankly, I don't always see the relevance of this, so don't beat yourself up if that explanation doesn't seem to make sense with specific sentences.


If the action is described in terms of the time (in the past) when it occurred, you must use the past. In other words, the following are all wrong because they have the present perfect where they should have the simple past.

*I have bought some printer ink yesterday.
*Lucy has seen her friend Jane last month.
*Pete has jumped when the alarm sounded.
*As soon as we noticed the accident, we have called the police.

If there is no mention of time, both tenses are grammatically correct. These are the problem cases for learners because one of the two tenses may be more appropriate than the other. Your best bet is to use the past in all cases unless you know from your study and experience that the situation requires the present perfect.


For example, you should have learned that you use the present perfect with a 'for' phrase to say how long an action occurred:

I have lived here for three years.

And with 'since' to say when a current action started:

Susan has studied French since she was a little girl.

You can use the simple past with these, and it would not be completely wrong, but it is usually more appropriate to use the present perfect.


When you have present evidence of a past event, the most logical tense is the present perfect regardless of when that past event actually happened.

Glaciers have carved out this entire valley in the last 10,000 years.

Little by little, as you study English, you can add more situations where you know that the present perfect is needed.

CJ

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GPY

E.g.:

1. He bought a car.
2. He has bought a car.

Both talk about a past purchase, but (2) has extra connotations that the purchase was recent and is of present relevance (he has the car now; maybe he's just told you about it, or you've just seen it, etc.).

Ok I got it but still I want to know if we use Past Simple like to tell my friend RIGHT NOW that I bought a car (we just ignore the present relevance just to emphesis the action) because when you are talking to someone about a story and its still relevant because somebody is listening so the Past simple is like well you did something in the past but you told him and now he know the result.


But the whole thing I'm looking for now is the Past Simple that we are using for example to tell what happened 1 hour ago (Hey I have to go because my friend forgot to take his notebook - well he forgot and the result is that he doesn't have it but I want to emphesis the action so Do I must ignore the result ?)

Result is something that frustrate me while thinking "Why he used Past simple than Present Perfect. I can see the result..."


I really don't understand those tenses ... And I want a simple answear because examples I have seen alot doesn't tell me something that I can say oooh there is a Gold Point in those 2 tenses that I can finally say why he used this tense in this fragment (of book, of music etc.)


And the last thing I want to say is "The Result disappear or not ?

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No time = Both correct. That's pretty wierd if we talk about tenses becase tense is created to emphesis the thing that (will happen, is happening or happened) the thing that can collapse those two tenses is pretty wierd.


And the argument that (You will learn from the education how and when to use those tenses) The thing is that school won't teach you everything, it can help you but if you have a bad teacher, blank in your knowlegde can be important in your real life experience but the best teacher is life that can be a school as well so that's why I'm trying to use it as well as school.


Of course when we use (TIME- when you learn something about those tenses you can remember it easily and ok rule is still a rule about time) but when there is no time that's the thing just do RANDOM pick that shouldn't be a point in those 2 tenses.


I have been learning about those 2 tenses for 2 months. And the result of reading some books, chatting with people here and not only, researching site about differences and similarity. So the only thing I can say about it is that when we talk about Past Simple the result definitely disappear because it's obvious.


Maybe I'm uncorret and English is more like a random pick in those 2 tenses and I shouldn't think about it so much but when I read a book and see those kind of things I want to rip those books instead of reading them


I really appreciate your answear and I wish you can somehow tell me the thing I mentioned in this one.


Going out of topic your signature CJ remindes me soo much GTA San Andreas charracter. Don't be mad or something it just reminded me good old days Emotion: big smile. Thanks a lot and I'm looking forward to your answear and again sorry if it disturbs you.

Xenon02 No time = Both correct.

Correct, but only grammatically correct. In a given situation one of the two may be so much more appropriate than the other that we have to say that one of them in incorrect, though not grammatically incorrect. The choice has to depend on the situation, not just on the grammar. So no, the choice is not random. However, if you get stuck when speaking or writing, and you need to make a choice quickly, I recommend that you guess the past tense. This little guideline won't be needed later, after you learn more.

Two months is very little. It usually takes four years to learn a language, and that's if you use it every day among native speakers. There are many more things to learn besides a few tenses.

Xenon02 Going out of topic your signature CJ remindes reminds me so much GTA ??? San Andreas character.

Emotion: tongue tied I have no idea what you're talking about.

CJ

CalifJimTwo months is very little. It usually takes four years to learn a language

Ok I know 2 months but it's not full language it's just finding the golden point betwen Past Simple and Present Perfect. Maybe it's not much but looking for a result for 2 months ...

CalifJimif you use it every day among native speakers.

1. Native speakers are not everywhere

2. Even when you chat with someone you don't know if his language is as good as native (ok practice no matter how good his language is but still you can say everything and or he will understand or not depend on his language level nothing else)

3. If you want to speak with a native teacher or someone else you need to pay (and this one is something that I can't afford)

4. You can do it for free of course but who wants to talk with you about Present Perfect or Past Simple (You want to focus on what is going now, or what do you want to do later)


As I said in other comment but you said about result but didn't mention the further thing what is Past Simple that vanish the result. You are mentioning that everything is result and okey that's something that nobody can't deny but as I said vanish the result emphesis the action.

Maybe I'm just dump dribbling those 2 tenses. The next fact is the situation like you said before the present result we see all time no matter what tense we will use and the example you pick can be also sayed in Past Simple like (written on sites can emphesis the action)


Glaciers have carved out this entire valley in the last 10,000 years. - result we see now


Glaciers carved out this entire valley in the last 10,000 years. - Action is more important


This is my "thinking" of these 2 tenses. Maybe it's wrong I don't know. Looking forward for next answear and sorry for asking so many question ... I'd appreciate it.

PS. I know there are more thing to learn than those 2 tenses but if there is something that disturbs you while doing doing some activities in learning english the best thing is to smash it with a solid answear that will make me go further.

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Xenon02 Glaciers have carved out this entire valley in the last 10,000 years. - result we see now
Glaciers carved out this entire valley in the last 10,000 years. - Action is more important
This is my thinking about these two tenses. Maybe it's wrong. I don't know.

It's not wrong. You can use the idea of 'result' to help you distinguish between the past and the present perfect. Just note that this difference will not be so obvious in every case.

Imagine that a child comes to the dinner table. His mother can ask either of these questions:

Have you washed your hands?
Did you wash your hands?

Neither of these stands out as a wrong way of asking the question regardless of how you analyze them in terms of results.


Use the search box to find tons of questions and answers about this topic.

CJ

CalifJimImagine that a child comes to the dinner table. His mother can ask either of these questions:
Have you washed your hands?
Did you wash your hands?

And this show that those tenses can be used interchangeable even when we see it through analyzing them in terms of results. Because it means the same because in one he has clean hands or not in other one it indicate the action he did it or not. And it's for me clean as diamond. But I was looking for the way how to interpret those 2 tenses If I know that we want to indicate action or result that can be interchangaeble when we think a little bit is more logical than saying (Past but what with result we don't say in web sites - and everybody thinks that they know when to use it and what the meaning it has behind ... )

CalifJimUse the search box to find tons of questions and answers about this topic.

Well you think I didn't used it ? Well I used and the only thing they were saying is quoting web sites without answearing (Result - what is result for them ? how do they see result in Past ?) If the fact that we can use it more by Past = Action / Present = Result but some facts can be interchangable regarding to want we want to emphesis or just want to ask without thinking about it.


For the end of this not small conversation. Past simple - more indicated in action but result still exist but action is more important / Present perfect - result is the thing here but action must be to show what result we have now


As a example from the book


Do you think he has interfered with those kids - result he is thinking if those kids aren't wounded or something (book)

Do you think he interfered with those kids - He want to indicate action the result can be same as th present one but he here more important was action


Or maybe we can use it interchangeable because it's pretty same. Or maybe the character used this tense because he wasn't thinking about which tense to use

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