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Hello, everybody
Here's the sentence that I don't quite understand:
"Only after two years did I connect this fear with anything in particular; but then I began to see that he must be looking at a special spot on the celestial vault whose position at different times corresponded to the direction of his glance-a spot roughly marked by the constellation Corona Borealis."
My question is about the form of the verb "must". Shouldn't it be "must have been"? Note that the sentence is old-style, written in 1923. The context is narrative and the person in question was no longer alive by the moment of speech.
Thanks in advance,
Anton
Comments  
Ant_222Shouldn't it be "must have been"?
I think so, yes, at least in today's English. Personally, I don't usually spend a lot of time trying to psychoanalyze why authors nearly 100 years ago chose this or that tense! Emotion: smile

CJ
CalifJim Personally, I don't usually spend a lot of time trying to psychoanalyze why authors nearly 100 years ago chose this or that tense!
Hello, CJ, and thanks for the feedback. I bet you don't stumble over such things either. You are a native and  most of the things that even experienced non-natives can't digest, you find natural.
When reading old Russian texts (17-19 centuries) I, too, rarely get confused by a strange construction or expression. I rather note to myself: «Hmmm, how interesting. The older usage is more logical and natural». What strikes me is the beauty and fidelity of the old style, not the oddness. It's a great fun to read an old (especially, of the pre-Pushkin era) book and find the origin of many modern Russian words, and the way the language has been changing.

What you may find especially interesting, Konstantin Bal'mont's translations of Edgar Poe are the best I have read, and they exploit the features of the old-style Russian to keep the translation close to the original way of expressing with such accuracy that I am sure cannot be achieved in modern Russian.
Anton 
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
That reminds me. Have you ever read a translation of Eugene Onegin (in English) that you found satisfactory?

CJ
CalifJimThat reminds me.  Have you ever read a translation of Eugene Onegin (in English) that you found satisfactory?

No, and I haven't read any translations of it. I mean prose, not poetry.
A list of all English trnalsations can be found at http://www-users.york.ac.uk/~pml1/onegin / (one in prose and all the rest in verse). The general view is that the best is that by Johnston - Peter M Lee
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Thanks, Peter! [Y]