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Ali: I had had my lunch then washed my hands in the canteen this morning.
Ali:I had my lunch then washed my hands in the canteen this morning.
I think the first one is just the right one.
Because I used past perfect for the action that happened before a past tense action.
This is a rule we have learnt.
Action happened before an action which is past tense we should use past perfect tense.
But I think the second one sounds more natural.
Many Thanks in Advance.
Victory Ong
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Comments  (Page 3) 
Hi,

Here is my conclusion after reading all this post, Could anybody correct me?

The first one is more common but Which do you think it is the better one?

Both are fine. What do you mean by 'better'?

(1)After she read the recipe, she baked the cake.

(2)After she had read the recipe, she baked the cake.

Can I understand past perfect tense in this way?

After she had read the recipe, she baked the cake.=After she had already read the recipe, she baked the cake. Yes, although we don't usually add 'already' to such a sentence.

Past perfect is just a tool to express the sequece and complement like the word "already".

So it's alternative when the sequence of something is clear. Yes.

I woke up and went to a toilet.

she read the recipe and baked the cake.

(To these sentence, I can use both past perfect and past tense, Because everyone knows that we should wake up fisrt before we go to a toilet(everyone knows the squence).everyone knows that the action of reading a recipe must happen before baking the cake. But using past perfect can emphase the sequece. But it sound unnatural to use past perfect in this type of sentence.

Yes.

Every sentence with sequencing word can use both past tense and past perfect tense, Yes, although I don't like to generalize so much by saying 'every one of the million entences that are psosssible'

but using past perfect tense is more less natural and more less common. So it's better to use past tense in the sentence with sequencing word. Yes, generally speaking.

She kicked him and then gave him a punch.

the sequencing is too very clear, although we can use past perfect tense, but it's better to use past tense because it's more common and using past perfect tense seem to be a redundant emphasis. Yes

She kicked him and gave him a punch.

Although there isn't any sequencing word, but sequence is not important.

So we can just use past tense.

Same with the last sentence, using past perfect tense seem to be a redundant emphasis.

This is a situation that we didn't discuss yet.

Often when we use the form 'She did A and she did B', we mean and understand that it is 'first A, then B'. But not always. For example, sometimes I tell you the most important thing first, but not necessarily the first chronological thing.

eg 'Yesterday I won the Nobel prize and had eggs for lunch.' I'm telling you about the Nobel prize first, because it is a very important event. But maybe I won it after lunch.

When a police ask us to tell him the whole fight?

We should say "She had kicked then gave him a punch"

Because the sequence is important here The sequence is perfectly clear with the Simple Past ,because of 'then'.

'Note that 'then' is not a conjunction. You need to say 'and then' or start a new sentence with 'Then'.

Post again if you still have queries.Emotion: smile

Best wishes, Clive

Thanks.
You really help me a lot, but I still get a problem!

I meant when my friends ask me what happen and I just intend to tell him what happened and doesn't intend to tell him the sequence.

Can I just answer him"She kicked him and gave him a punch"?

I ask so because I think past perfect is just a tool to express sequence when we doesn't what to express sequence we can just use past tense even there isn't any sequencing word and the sequence of something is not clear.

Yesterday I won the Nobel prize and had eggs for lunch.' I'm telling you about the Nobel prize first, because it is a very important
Just like this sentence, If I just hope to tell my friend what I did yesterday and doesn't intend to tell him the sequence. Can I just simply use past tense

Many thanks in Advance
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Am I right?
Hi,

I meant when my friends ask me what happen and I just intend to tell him what happened and doesn't intend to tell him the sequence.

Can I just answer him"She kicked him and gave him a punch"? Yes.

I ask so because I think past perfect is just a tool to express sequence when we doesn't what to express sequence we can just use past tense even there isn't any sequencing word and the sequence of something is not clear. Yes.

Yesterday I won the Nobel prize and had eggs for lunch.' I'm telling you about the Nobel prize first, because it is a very important

Just like this sentence, If I just hope to tell my friend what I did yesterday and doesn't intend to tell him the sequence. Can I just simply use past tense Yes

Clive
Part of the English learning is to develop a sense when to use the proper tense for the context you have in mind.

Most people we come across in our everyday life probably don't give too much emphasis in past perfect in conversation to describe what they did or happened during the course of the day, although several events may have happened in sequence. I went to the dentist's office before I went to work. There is nothing wrong with this simple past tense to describe the 2 things I did today.

You may ask "why can't we use past perfect?". Yes you may. But to some, it is rather a bit overly literally grammatical and heavy and they may opt not to use it.
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Developping a sense to catch up with the natural use of tenses is a real headache for some foreign learners. For example the use of before introducing a past perfect part that happened after the main action. She read the recipe before she had made the cake. I find it curious and not well documented.
Thanks.
THe only way this sentence could ahve worked is this:

A- She can't even boil water to make tea. She baked a cake!

B- Well, it's true. "She'd read the recipe before she baked the cake".
I want to narrate something in the past. I don't know if for the underlined part I have to use present perfect of past perfect.

He went to the party and found out that he has/had left his cell phone at home.
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And again for narrating something in the past. For example:
Whenever you would see her you thought it was/has been/had been a week that she hasn't/hadn't combed her hair.