+0
I don't think I totally understand this word and I am not sure I could find a Chinese equivalent for it, not by its definition but how it's used. According to the Cambridge Dictionary's definition, it means "to speak to or behave towards someone as if they are stupid or unimportant".

Here's one example in which I've heard it used.........hmm on TV[:^)]. This is how I remember the dialogue, it may not be exact but the point is how it is said:

female: I don't think I can ever salvage the damage that's been done. How could this have happened? What am I gonna do?

male (showing undersanding and sympathy): Ah, don't worry about it. Things will work out....(speech unfinished)

female (huffed in anger): Oh, don't patronize me.......

So how is it patronizing? Or does "patronize" have a....I don't know, hidden meaning that a dictionary can't let on?

Thanks in advance

Raen
1 2 3
Comments  (Page 2) 
wow. appears cussing is censored. seems a bit silly. understanding proper curse words is important. even if you don't plan to use them.
.
Sorry, mainmix-- there are plenty of other chatter sites where you can curse your little heart out.

Funny-- I don't feel silly at all about maintaining some decorum here.
.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
I'm not sure if you meant your reply as offensive but I surely took it that way. I am not here to "chatter". I am here to help people and to give detailed replies. Curse words are something people will come across in English and, to be quite honest, one needs to understand the way a native speaker uses them.

I agree about decorum. My reply was not meant as chatter but as another insight into how language meaning can very depending upon region, etc.

I'd end this post with a fitting phrase but it would be too obvious.
Mister Micawber.
when (in america) someone from a more unfriendly location (north east, etc.) interacts with someone from a friendly location (south, midwest).
Shades of Sarah Palin!

"Palin also made a point of mentioning that she loved to visit the 'pro-America' areas of the country, of which North Carolina is one. No word on which states she views as unpatriotic."
.

So is this "chatter" too? Seems far more off topic than what I posted. Sad that I've gotten into a scuffle on my first day. Emotion: sad
Hi,
Sad that I've gotten into a scuffle on my first day I did too, as I recollect.

Oh, well. Tomorrow is another day.

(That's a quote from Scarlett O'Hara, who coincidentally was also the first to use the expression "Great b***s of fire!" )

Clive
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
I see the thread took a little turn somewhere Emotion: smile. But thanks to all for sharing their opinions.

Now I'm sure there isn't a Chinese translation for "patronize" by the way it is used. Would you say that native speakers use it rather loosely? According to the definitions from various sources on the internet:

1) To treat in a condescending manner.

2) To exercise an arrogant condescension toward (note the word "arrogant"?)

3) To treat in a superciliously indulgent manner

Example:

They don't remember what it's like to be 12-years-old. They patronize, they treat children as inferiors. Well I won't do that.

It must be the way I interpret the definitions, I just can't get my head around to see in the dialogue I provided that the man was being patronizing or condescending, wasn't he being sweet and encouraging? I would have no problem labelling him as a "patronizing pig" if he were to respond: "Oh please, get over yourself and quit whinning.", or would you say that's something else?

As for the example in a restaurant given by Mainmix, don't we all commit that sin to our friends, families one time or another where we say things we don't really mean? So do we all patronize then?
Hi,

condescend - behave as if one is on equal terms with an inferior, usually while maintainning an attitude of superiority.

Patronizing often seems on the surface to be friendly and supportive.It's only when you look deeper that you realize it's not exactly that. Thus, what one person thinks is patronizing, another might think of as kind and friendly. It's not always just a matter of words. It can also involve facial expression, tone of voice, previous history between the two people, and the nature of their relationship.

Oh please, get over yourself and quit whinning. if someone says this to you, they are clearly not being friendly on the surface. So, it's not patronizing. It's simply rude.

Me: "Excuse me, I've been waiting on my meal for some time now. Can you check on it?"

You: "I'm sorry sir, I'll go check on that right away"

I don't see this as patronizing. The waiter is not acting as if he is superior to the customer. The waiter is just being insincere.

female: I don't think I can ever salvage the damage that's been done. How could this have happened? What am I gonna do?

male (showing undersanding and sympathy): Ah, don't worry about it. Things will work out..(speech unfinished)

female (huffed in anger): Oh, don't patronize me..

As I think I said, the woman apparently thinks that behind the man's kind words, he really feels that she is acting like a child and that she does not understand the situation as well as he does.

Try to invent and post some more examples of someone being patronizing, if you wish, and we'll check them for you.

Best wishes, Clive.
.
, I just can't get my head around to see in the dialogue I provided that the man was being patronizing or condescending, wasn't he being sweet and encouraging?
Again: what the man said in your transcribed dialogue is irrelevant. The woman thinks he is being patronizing, so she uses the word, with the meanings you have listed.
.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Thanks to Clive and Mr. Micawber again.
CliveTry to invent and post some more examples of someone being patronizing, if you wish, and we'll check them for you.
I haven't been able to come up with any examples, but there's a series of IBM TV commercials that involve a young guy (incarnation of Steve Job) and a middle-aged man (that of Bill Gates) having dialogues, which I thought might be examples of possible patronizing, if I've understood you guys correctly. I do hope you watch TV so you know what I'm talking about, if you do, would you say the young guy could come across a little patronizing?! Thanks again.

Raen
Show more