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Hi,

Can you see which is correct below?
Let me pay the money to the cashier.
Let me pay the paper money to the cashier.
Let me pay the bill to the cashier.

Thank you.
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Comments  
None. 'Pay' and 'money' are essentially overlapping.

Let me pay the cashier.
Let me pay the cashier.
Let me pay the bill.
Thank you.

Can I say:
Let me give the money to the cashier;
Let me give the paper money to the cashier?
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stephenlearnerLet me give the money to the cashier;
This one is OK; the second is never heard.
Hi,

We often just say
eg Let me pay.
eg I'll pay.

Clive
In case it figures in, I want to observe that paper money is "bills" as opposed to coin. "Here, give the cashier the bills, and I'll put the coins in the safe."
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Thank all of you.

Can you see my understanding of bill is correct?
When you say "give the cashier the bill or bills", the bill or bills refer to paper money.
When you say "pay the bill or bills", the bill or bills refer to a debt, a payable, a fee that you owe somebody.
Hi,

That's right.

But you could go to a restaurant in an English-speaking country every night for 20 years and never hear a customer say 'Give the cashier the bills', meaning paper money.
It's all just referred to as 'money'.

Clive
.
CliveBut you could go to a restaurant in an English-speaking country every night for 20 years and never hear a customer say 'Give the cashier the bills', meaning paper money.
Right. In my example above, I was the owner directing the disposition of restaurant funds.
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