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Dear Teachers,

1. - I often go to school on my own.

- I often go to school by myself.

- I often go to school alone.

- Are these the same meaning? or are there any differences?

2. Maybe you can talk to your brothers about helping you out on eveings.

- "help you out" here means "help you get over tough circumstances", right?

3. Hold on a little more and you will see that that this is going to pay off soon enough.

- "pay off" here means "going to be successful", right?

4. Come on! you don't have to do all of this on your own.

- Why don't you say "all of these" instead of "all of this"?

Thanks very much to Teachers,

Stevenukd.
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3. Hold on a little more and you will see that that this is going to pay off soon enough.

- "pay off" here means "going to be successful", right?
You will be rewarded for your efforts. And yes, this may mean being successful in some way or another.

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pay off

intransitive verb

to yield returns either of profit or loss <the investment paid off handsomely> b : to reach successful realization <the years of patience and persistence had at last paid off> <boldness is the only course that will pay off
-- E.B.George>


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Hi,

1. - I often go to school on my own. Sounds a little like a child speaking. An adult is expected to be capable of doing such things on their own.

- I often go to school by myself. Commonly said.

- I often go to school alone. Less common. 'Alone' is an emotive word. Perhaps people don't like you?

- Are these the same meaning? or are there any differences?

2. Maybe you can talk to your brothers about helping you out on eveings.

- "help you out" here means "help you get over tough circumstances", right? It does have that meaning in some contexts. Here, it just means 'assist you'.

3. Hold on a little more and you will see that that this is going to pay off soon enough.

- "pay off" here means "going to be successful", right? Not exactly. It means your hard work or patience will be rewarded soon.

4. Come on! you don't have to do all of this on your own.

- Why don't you say "all of these" instead of "all of this"? 'This' refers to eg 'this thing', this work'. It's really a 'no-count' type of reference.

Best wishes, Clive
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Comments  
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help out


: to render assistance : be of use <won a scholarship which would help out -- MacKinlay Kantor>
transitive verb : to give aid to<agreed to help him out>


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Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Clive- I often go to school alone. Less common. 'Alone' is an emotive word. Perhaps people don't like you?
Very well put.