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I am new to this forum..

Please help me out with my doubts..

In teh following example, which is correct in GMATLand, what is "that is bringing" referring to ??
As I understand that is referring to "market".. But I somehow get the impression that "that" should refer to "television shows" and correct sentence should contain "that are bringing" instead of "that is bringing".

Out of public's interest in the details of and conflicts in other people's lives has grown a booming market for "reality" television shows that is bringing "regular" people onto the television screen with increasing frequency.

how will you figure out what is "that" referring to in such complex sentences ??

Kaplan ,a GMAT book, explains this as below. .
Out of the .... interest... has grown a ... market ...that is bringing....
So "that " is referring to market.

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Hi Sharad,

Welcome to EnglishForward. I hope you enjoy yourself here.

I agree that this sentence is not very clearly constructed; however, 'that' refers to 'market' because 'market' is singular, and 'that is' is singular. 'Shows' is plural.
Hi Mister Micawber,

thanks for the reply. Here is anther choice given for the same qn in GMAT..

Out of public's interest in the details of and conflicts in other people's lives has grown a booming market for "reality" television shows that bring "regular" people onto the television screen with increasing frequency.

Here that is refering "television shows" correct ??

Please let me know if this sentence is also grammatically correct ??

So What is that refering to, in the following sentence ??
(note that it is "markets" now). well, this is not a choice mentioned in gmat qn..Emotion: smile

Out of public's interest in the details of and conflicts in other people's lives has grown a booming markets for "reality" television shows that bring "regular" people onto the television screen with increasing frequency.
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a booming market for "reality" television shows that bring : Yes, the reference is to "shows".

has grown a booming markets for "reality" television shows that bring : Here you spoiled your own example!

"has" should be "have" and remove the "a": have grown booming markets for "reality" television shows that bring : Now the reference is ambiguous; it's either "markets" or "shows", but we probably hear it as "shows" because it's closer to "that".
thanks.. that clarified the things.
Just another doubt..

In the following sentence, what is that illustrate ? nations or relations between nations or episodes ??

Dr. Sayre's lecture recounted several little-known episodes in the relations between nations that illustrate what is wrong with alliances and treaties that do not have popular support.
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'Episodes... that illustrate'. In this case, it takes some semantic interpretation to see that the episodes are meant as illustrations by the lecturer rather than the relations themselves.
Thanks.. I was under the impression that modifier should always be closer to what it modifies.
This rule many a times left me confused..
Emotion: big smile
Shorter modifiers are usually closer to the word they modify; longer ("heavier") modifiers can be placed farther away, and often are.

Note how awkward the alternative is. In fact, it borders on incomprehensible:

... little-known episodes that illustrate what is wrong with alliances and treaties that do not have popular support in the relations between nations
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