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only to medical It is impossible to be engaging in ... "quackery" in those sources came anywhere close to your definition.

This is perhaps a little trickier than it looks. I may not be a quack, but I may pass on ... to get out of his fingertips. What he said sounded like quackery, though he himself wasn't practising quackery, didn't it?.

I wouldn't call it "quackery," no. I'd call such beliefs "crackpottery," "crackpot beliefs," or "pseudoscientific beliefs." "Quackery" is what is practiced by a "quack."

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
(snip)
I wouldn't call it "quackery," no. I'd call such beliefs "crackpottery," "crackpot beliefs," or "pseudoscientific beliefs." "Quackery" is what is practiced by a "quack."

You left out "psychoceramics".
Sincerely,
Gene Wirchenko
Computerese Irregular Verb Conjugation:
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He/She has prejudices.
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(snip)

I wouldn't call it "quackery," no. I'd call such beliefs "crackpottery," "crackpot beliefs," or "pseudoscientific beliefs." "Quackery" is what is practiced by a "quack."

You left out "psychoceramics".

I was unaware of the term. After having done a bit of googling, however, it seems that "psychoceramics" does not mean "crackpottery." According to

http://www.carnagevisors.net/mailman/listinfo/psychoceramics

this is the definition: "Psychoceramics is the study of crackpots and crackpot phenomena. This includes things such as weird science and pseudoscience, bizarre religion, kooky solutions to the world problem and other things."
Are you aware of a different definition for the term?

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
Raymond S. Wise wrote on 02 Jun 2004:
(snip) You left out "psychoceramics".

I was unaware of the term. After having done a bit of googling, however, it seems that "psychoceramics" does not ... This includes things such as weird science and pseudoscience, bizarre religion, kooky solutions to the world problem and other things."

If "crackpots and crackpot phenomena" don't constitute "crackpottery", what does?

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor.
For email, replace numbers with English alphabet.
Raymond S. Wise wrote on 02 Jun 2004:

I was unaware of the term. After having done a ... religion, kooky solutions to the world problem and other things."

If "crackpots and crackpot phenomena" don't constitute "crackpottery", what does? Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor. For email, replace numbers with English alphabet.

But "psychoceramics" as given as the "study of crackpots and crackpot phenomena." It was evident to me when I read the above definition that the sort of people who constituted the psychoceramicists are the same sort of people who constitute the Committee for the Scientific Investigation of Claims of the Paranormal ("CSICOP") and the readership of Skeptic magazine, that is, critics of crackpottery. In other words, the psychoceramicists are people like me, fellow skeptics.

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Raymond S. Wise wrote on 02 Jun 2004:
Raymond S. Wise wrote on 02 Jun 2004: If "crackpots ... & medical editor. For email, replace numbers with English alphabet.

But "psychoceramics" as given as the "study of crackpots and crackpot phenomena." It was evident to me when I read ... readership of Skeptic magazine, that is, critics of crackpottery. In other words, the psychoceramicists are people like me, fellow skeptics.

I just looked it up on the Web and saw that this quasi-academic discipline was created by the indefatigable traveling professor Josiah S. Carberry, Brown University, 1929-??. Now it all comes back to me. We were treated to a spate of articles about the mysterious Prof. Carberry every year in the Brown Daily Herald . Sightings were regularly reported and lectures were regularly announced and cancelled Carberrry's lectures, that is.

I would say that this is the study of crackpottery and it seems to be engaged in not so much fellow skeptics but people who like laughing at the sublimely ridiculous. They aren't trying to out any quacks but to sniff out the risible. No, Psychoceramics is not crackpottery itself, but it is all about crackpottery.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor.
For email, replace numbers with English alphabet.
only to medical source definitions

This is perhaps a little trickier than it looks. I ... like quackery, though he himself wasn't practising quackery, didn't it?.

I wouldn't call it "quackery," no. I'd call such beliefs "crackpottery," "crackpot beliefs," or "pseudoscientific beliefs." "Quackery" is what is practiced by a "quack."

Flaming Google seems to have swallowed up my comment, so I'll try to remember what I'd excogitated.
In essence, I think I said I thought the term was legitimately applied to the advice itself, not merely the activity of the quack; it would therefore remain quackery if I were to pass it on, even though I make no pretension to medical learning. Further, that it comfortably extends to non-medical fields. OED1's examples seemed to support both views, one of them being a quotation (1898ish) in which theosophy was referred to as 'quackery'.
I felt we should leave out of the discussion Quackery 2, a nonce-word appearing in two authors meaning 'the quacking of a number of ducks'.
Mike.