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Before going jogging, people should begin ___ some warm-up exercises. (A) to (B) from (C) into (D) with
The answer is option D. Is option B also acceptable?
Comments  
D (with) is the only one that works here.
"From" makes sense logically, as a starting point for your session, but it's never used. "To begin with," "Beginning with," "should/must begin with" are such common expressions the "from" seems to have no use, unless we're referring to a numbered list of exercises. In this case, I'd say it would be natural to optionally use "from."

"This time we're going to begin from the beginning."

"On the second day you should begin with/from exercise #3, and proceed through #10." (Let's say these are used, but probably not correct.)

In another context, I believe "You should begin from point C," would be natural, but so would "at point C," which places us at some distance from your question.

Actually, I think this distinction applies to your original. "With" is a beginning exercise; "from" is a beginning point.
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sitifanBefore going jogging, people should begin ___ some warm-up exercises. (A) to (B) from (C) into (D) with
The answer is option D. Is option B also acceptable?

No. No. No. Emotion: smile

begin with [noun]
end with [noun]

CJ
CalifJim begin with [noun]
end with [noun]

Hi, Jim, I'm not quite sure how to fill this prescription. Is it meant to describe the use of "to begin" and "to end," or is it meant to describe what follows "begin with" and "end with"?

May we say "begin from [noun]; end at [noun]"?

Is something like "Let's begin from scratch," justified as a fixed expression, or something else?

I'm admittedly uncomfortable with "The race will begin from a standing position," but I don't much like "at a standing position," or "with a standing position" either.

"Begin" and "start" seem to work about the same in these situations. I can't quite put my finger on when we must not use "begin from," although I can list examples.

- A.
I was referring to situations like that in the original post, where there are a series of activities, and you want to say which one you begin with and which one you end with.

We began (the meeting) with a prayer, and we ended with a patriotic song.

That sort of thing. begin / end by ---ing is another:

We began by saying a prayer, and we ended by singing a patriotic song.

There may be many other patterns that are used for different situations, and various fixed expressions, of course, that don't match the patterns above, but in any case begin from a prayer and end from a songwon't do. Emotion: smile

CJ
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Many thanks.