The epithet "pepsi" or "pepsi mae west" has for a long time been applied to French Canadians, by English- Canadians because of their supposed preference for Pepsi over Coke and for liking the chocolate bar called Mae West. Does anyone know when this term originated and whether it still is considered insulting? The reason I ask is because a couple of daysd a group of Quebecois youths referring to each other as "pepsis" in a light-hearted manner.
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The epithet "pepsi" or "pepsi mae west" has for a long time been applied to French Canadians, by English- Canadians ... because a couple of daysd a group of Quebecois youths referring to each other as "pepsis" in a light-hearted manner.

Yes, if directed by an anglophone at a francophone. Also franco to franco if used in a disparaging tone of voice (the class thing, doncher know. And yes, it exists everywhere. The class thing, I mean.)
On the other hand, the way it was used in your case was not unusual either. It's a joke. They probably used "***", too. To them, it wouldn't be swearing.
Cheers, Sage
"retrosorter" (Email Removed) a écrit dans le message de
The epithet "pepsi" or "pepsi mae west" has for a long time been applied to French Canadians, by English- Canadians ... because a couple of daysd a group of Quebecois youths referring to each other as "pepsis" in a light-hearted manner.

It's spelled "May West" and it's not a chocolate bar, it's a small cake:


As for being called Pepsi, it's not considered "insulting"...mainly because it's not used in Quebec at all and very few quebecers know about this story...the "victim" most likely wouldn't give a *** and give a weird look at the offender.
Ben
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Le 15 Jun 2005 09:31:35 -0700, "retrosorter" (Email Removed) écrivait dans soc.culture.quebec:
The epithet "pepsi" or "pepsi mae west" has for a long time been applied to French Canadians, by English- Canadians ... because a couple of daysd a group of Quebecois youths referring to each other as "pepsis" in a light-hearted manner.

Why do you consider them as insulting ?
Pepsi: it seems only Quebeckers purchase more pepsi than coke. The reason seems to be the advertisements. In Quebec, Pepsi is using Claude Meunier, humorist and author of La Petite Vie, a very popular sitcom (I think it scored among the 5 or 10 more seen programs and even the replays were in the top 10 of a typical season). So, calling us "pepsi" is not very meaningfull. It only means we drink more pepsi and this is only because of the choice of Meunier.

May West: this is not a chocolat bar but a cake. Again, this is not very insulting. The name is from a local made pastry by Stuart, purchased in 1979 by Vachon (company renamed Culinar in 1977 but Vachon was kept as a brand) and owned by Saputo since 1999. http://www.vachon.com/produits.php?lg=en and click May West to see what is a May West !
Calling "black" a black is not by itselt insulting. It is by associating it to pejorative names that you change the scope.
Denis
The epithet "pepsi" or "pepsi mae west" has for a long time been applied to French Canadians, by English- Canadians ... the chocolate bar called Mae West. Does anyone know when this term originated and whether it still is considered insulting?

Urbandictionary.com apparently defines it as a "derogatory term for low class French-Canadians" (similar to calling someone "trailer trash", perhaps?)
Googling for the terms "pepsi" plus either "May West" or "Mae West" doesn't turn up many references to the phrase, and the ones I saw seemed to indicate that it's considered a rather light-hearted insult these days. One poster explained it as the Canadian equivalent of "an RC Cola and a Moon Pie".
The epithet "pepsi" or "pepsi mae west" has for a ... referring to each other as "pepsis" in a light-hearted manner.

It's spelled "May West" and it's not a chocolate bar, it's a small cake: As for being called Pepsi, ... know about this story...the "victim" most likely wouldn't give a *** and give a weird look at the offender. Ben

yes, it used to be insulting like "canuck" was until we had the "Crazy Canucks" ski team

Marko Jotic
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Les origines sont plus lointaines que la publicté de Meunier. La vraie raison c'est qu'effectivement il se vendait plus de Pepsi que de Coke au Québec et à cette époque pour le même prix, le format du Pepsi était plus gros. Donc les anglos nous considéraient comme des 'CHEAPS' de boire une marque qui offrait quelques onces de plus pour le mëme prix. On laissait sous-entendre que l'on sacrifiait la qualité pour la quantité.

Effectivement, il s'est toujours plus vendu de pepsi que de coke au Québec et nous serions donc une exception en amérique.
"Denis Beauregard" (Email Removed) a écrit dans le message de
The epithet "pepsi" or "pepsi mae west" has for a long time been applied to French Canadians, by English- Canadians because of their supposed preference for Pepsi over Coke . . .

1. Yes, Pepsi is sometimes used as an insult.(But the only French Canadan I know who drinks
pop for choice prefers Pepsi.)

2. Next to no English-Canadians have everheard of May West. (They may know Jos-Louis,
another brand of cake.)

3. If you want to stick the knife in, call yourFrench Canadian friend ketaine (from English
kitten: it refers to his aesthetic taste.)

Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)
I seem to remember first hearing the term "pepsi" used to describe French-Canadians in the 1960s and the term supposedly derived for the preference among French Canadians of Pepsi over Coke. It always struck me as a not-too-malicious designation - somewhat akin to "'frog"(for a Frenchman). "***" (for a German) and "pea soup" (for French Canadians) because of culinary preferences. The former Prime Minister Jean Chretien used to say that he was proud to be a "pea soup." But whereas, French-Canadians seemed aware of the designation "pea soup", I got the impression that the designation "pepsi" was not as well known, that is why I was surprised when I heard French Canadians using the term "pepsi" to describe themselves.

Also , I seem to recall that sometime in the 1980s, the term "pepsi" morphed into "pepper" and this became probably the more common designation.
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