I raised this question about 7 years ago in this NG. I remember the answer but not the authority.
When a sentence ends with a quotation the period goes inside the quotation marks. But I understand that when the sentence ends with quotation marks that are not used to set off a quotation but are used to set off a special phrase the period goes outside the quotation marks. EXAMPLE: This agreement is between The Acme Merchandising Company, Inc. hereafter referred to as "Vendor" and John Doe hereafter referred to as "Customer".
I need an authority for this. I am in a dispute with a stuborne person who insists that when ever a sentence ends with quotation marks that the period goes inside.
Also would the same principle apply to a sentence that ended with an Email address set off with . This same person insists that the period shoud goe inside the carots.
Example: Please respond to (Email Removed).

~~
"Patriotism is the last refuge of the scoundrel." Samuel Johnson "Patriotism is your conviction that this country is superior to all other countries because you were born in it."
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Marc
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I am in a dispute with a stuborne person who insists that when ever a sentence ends with quotation marks that the period goes inside.

I believe the period got moved inside the quotation marks regardless of whether it made sense back when lead type was hand set.
The period was a tiny, thin piece of type and if it had only a space after it had an unfortunate habit of getting broken off between the type stick and the press. Most often by the rag used to clean the type in the galley or even once the page had been locked into the chase after proofing. So the proof showed it there but when the press ran it had disappeared. If you were very unlucky it got wedged somewhere else on the page and made a real mess. Involving stopping the print run, loosening the quoins, fixing it with tweezers and hoping you could get it all back together so the whole thing didn't end up a mess.

So we were taught (at Paseo High School by Charles Barrett, 1943-1947) that the period went inside the quote.
Why didn't periods break off when the character ahead of them was something other than a close quotes mark? They did. But the ones inside were that many you didn't have to worry about.
If..memory serves. Which it does with decreasing frequency these days.
(It's stubborn, by the way. And whenever is one word. And the sentence needs only one that. I'd lose the second one. Sorry. The old proof-reader.)

ELGelhaar
I raised this question about 7 years ago in this NG. I remember the answer but not the authority. When ... Doe hereafter referred to as "Customer". I need an authority for this. I am in a dispute with a stuborne

Oy!
person who insists that when ever a sentence ends with quotation marks that the period goes inside.

You have a problem. If your posting is accurate in indicating that you are at Cal Berkeley (my alma mater, BTW; class of 1961), you're asking about American usage and you are the one who is wrong. Except in certain technical writing where clarity is absolutely essential, standard American practice is always to put the period inside the closing quotation mark. Same for commas. What you describe is British practice. (Some Americans follow British practice. That doesn't make it American practice. It just makes those Americans eccentric. (Hi, Bob))
Needless to say, it's not at all easy to cite you an American style manual that tells you to do what Americans do not in fact do. Here's something that tells you you're wrong; it's from the FAQ at the website for the Chicago Manual of Style:

Q. Apparently Americans enclose periods commas inside quotation marks, but do the British do it that way too?
A. In what is sometimes called the British style (see paragraph
6.10), only those punctuation points that appeared in the originalmaterial should be included within the quotation marks; all others follow the closing quotation marks. This system works best with single quotation marks. (The British tend to use double quotation marks only for quotations within quotations.)

The question makes clear what the manual says American practice is (the FAQ answers questions that are based on what the manual says), and the answer makes clear that British practice differs.
Also would the same principle apply to a sentence that ended with an Email address set off with . This same person insists that the period shoud goe inside the carots.

I assume "shoud" and "goe" are typos. As for "carots," the proper spelling is "carets."

I'm not sure what this is supposed to be an example of, but it is the correct form. The closing period does NOT go inside the carets. This is not the same as for quotation marks. Putting the closing period inside would add the period to the URL and make it not work properly.

Bob Lieblich
Full stop
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Or maybe the British practice just makes more sense.
I need an authority for this. I am in a dispute with a stuborne person who insists that when ever a sentence ends with quotation marks that the period goes inside.

This proves only that the other person is American and you are not. The convention varies from country to country. (Although the "logical" convention, the one that says that you should put quotation marks around only what is being quoted, seems to be gaining favour in the USA.)

This case is more clear-cut. It tends to suggest that the stubborn person is more than a little stupid. The whole point of the carets is to make it clear that the following punctuation is not part of the address.

Peter Moylan (Email Removed) http://eepjm.newcastle.edu.au (OS/2 and eCS information and software)
I need an authority for this. I am in a ... sentence ends with quotation marks that the period goes inside.

This proves only that the other person is American and you are not. The convention varies from country to country. ... that you should put quotation marks around only what is being quoted, seems to be gaining favour in the USA.)

Doesn't it seem silly to put quotes around a single word that happens to end the sentence and include the period to end the entire sentence inside those "quotes?" I can't believe the rule applies to question "marks".
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I need an authority for this. I am in a ... sentence ends with quotation marks that the period goes inside.

This proves only that the other person is American and you are not. The convention varies from country to country. ... that you should put quotation marks around only what is being quoted, seems to be gaining favour in the USA.)

This case is more clear-cut. It tends to suggest that the stubborn person is more than a little stupid. The whole point of the carets is to make it clear that the following punctuation is not part of the address.

Are they called carets? I thought the caret was ^. is "greater than". And there's my/the British way of positioning full stops.
Edward

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This case is more clear-cut. It tends to suggest that ... that the following punctuation is not part of the address.

Are they called carets? I thought the caret was[/nq]^. is "greater than". And there's my/the British way of positioning full stops.

Agreed. In this context they're usually called "angle brackets".

David
Doesn't it seem silly to put quotes around a single word that happens to end the sentence and include the period to end the entire sentence inside those "quotes?" I can't believe the rule applies to question "marks".

Good thing, because it doesn't. The American rule applies to commas and periods, not to question marks.
I assume you surrounded "marks" with quotation marks out of sheer mischief.

Donna Richoux
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