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What is the difference between the following sentences"

1. By this time next year, I will have started my new job.

2. At this time next year, I will have started my new job.

My answer:

1. Before this time next year, I will have started my new job.

2. I don't think the second sentence is different from the first one. Am I right?

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I feel a slight difference in tone here. by this time suggests to me that you are happy about your new job and hoping that the time before you start will pass quickly.

Clive

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Omar Ahmed

What is the difference between the following sentences"

1. By this time next year, I will have started my new job.

2. At this time next year, I will have started my new job.

My answer:

1. Before this time next year, I will have started my new job.
??? I don't see how this is an answer to the question you asked above. It's just another sentence that means the same thing.

2. I don't think the second sentence is different from the first one. Am I right? Yes. All three say essentially the same thing.

S: the time you say it (now)
R: reference time (this time next year)
E: event time (when your job starts)

- - - S - - - - - - - - - - - - - R
- - - - [ -------- E -------- ]

In effect, 'by' = 'before or at'.

CJ

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Comments  
Omar AhmedI don't think the second sentence is different from the first one. Am I right?

Yes and no. "At" fixes a point in time, and logically speaking, when this date and time arrives next year, you will have. The problem is that we say "by" for that, and "at" seems to apply to "will have started", but that tense looks back from a future time. You can't both start at a time and have that time be in the past.

 Clive's reply was promoted to an answer.
 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
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