+0

Hello


--Please confirm if these are grammatically correct


1. I look forward to completing my tasks(phrasal verb)


2. His appeal to reconsidering (phrasal verb)


3. In order to complete my tasks



--Which one is preferred/correct


Translating to english

Or

Translation to English


I wish him a speedy recovery(noun)

Or

I wish you a speedy recovering (gerund)

Or

I wish you to speedily recover(infinitive)


recovering is difficult

Or

Recovery is difficult


--Having/to have gone through project details, is this sentence in a perfect tense


--I was in a meeting (is this a gerund)

+2

That's far too many questions for one post.

Please ask only one question per post.

+0
anonymous1. I look forward to completing my tasks. (phrasal verb)

OK.

anonymous2. His appeal to reconsidering (phrasal verb)

That's not a sentence, and I'm not sure what it means.

anonymous3. In order to complete my tasks

That's incomplete. It's a dependent (not an independent) clause. You can say, for example:

In order to complete my tasks, I need an extra two weeks.

anonymousTranslating to English Or Translation to English

Both are possible. You need to show us them in full sentences for us to give you an answer.

anonymousI wish him a speedy recovery. (noun)

OK.

anonymousI wish you a speedy recovering. (gerund)

No. That's unnatural.

anonymous--I was in a meeting. (is this a gerund)

No. In the above sentence, "meeting" is a noun.

anonymous--Having/to have gone through project details. is this sentence in a perfect tense

That's not a sentence. For "to have done", look up perfect infinitive. For "having done", look up perfect participle.

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
1 2
Comments  

--Please confirm if these are grammatically correct


1. I look forward to completing my tasks(phrasal verb)


2. His appeal to reconsidering (phrasal verb)


3. In order to complete my tasks

question is about phrasal verbs and the correct use of it. Please let me know if above sentences are correct

Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
 teechr's reply was promoted to an answer.

Thanks teechr for your reply


1. His 'appeal to' -reconsidering or reconsider my application. Should is use (ing) since it is a phrasal verb, which is correct.


2. You mentioned meeting is a noun, gerund are also noun. When we add ing to verb in order to use that verb as a noun in my knowledge. Ist that right

3. Having gone through the detail I no can estate the cost. (Is this a perfect tense)

I did not get the answer


4. which one is preferred to use Gerunds or Nominalized verb form in place of noun.


Like recovery or recovering, development or developing

anonymous1. His 'appeal to' reconsidering or reconsider my application. Should is I use (ing) since it is a phrasal verb? Which is correct?

That (appeal to) is not a phrasal verb. For example:

His appeal to reconsider my application came as a surprise.

[ answer: we do not use "-ing"]

anonymous2. You mentioned "meeting" is a noun, but gerunds are also nouns. When we add "-ing" to a verb, in order to we can use that verb as a noun in my knowledge. Isn't that right?

Gerunds are not nouns, even though they often behave in a very similar way to them.

anonymous3. Having gone through the detail, I now can estate estimate the cost. (Is this a perfect tense?)

No. The "having gone" part is an example of a perfect participle. One, very common, perfect tense in English is the present perfect tense. For example,

I've never been to Brazil.

anonymous4. which one is preferred to use, gerunds or nominalized verb forms in place of nouns - like recovery or recovering, development or developing?

That depends on the individual sentence.

Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies

Hello Teechr


1. What is the difference between phrasal verbs, idioms and verbal idioms, if there is any and how to know that?

" Why im asking this is because we use base form of verb after an idiom or verbal idiom but gerund after a phrsal verb"

i used to do, and i look forward to doing it.

Eg. Used to, is/am to , were to, in order to , look forward to etc ..


2. Verbal idioms vs infinitive


I like to do it (verb + infinitive to do)

I used to do it (here used to- is an idiom so bit confused if to do works as infinitive verb as in above sentence.


Thanks and best

anonymousWhat is the difference between phrasal verbs, idioms and verbal idioms, if there is any and how to know that?

A phrasal verb is a [ verb] + [ an adverb] or [ a preposition] or [ an adverb and a preposition]

https://www.lexico.com/en/grammar/phrasal-verbs


An idiom is just a word combination that has a particular meaning, although the meanings of the individual words in it do not obviously amount to the meaning of the whole expression. For example, I'm over the moon. In this idiom, which means very happy, neither "over" nor "moon" necessarily imply great happiness.


A verbal idiom is a phrasal verb whose overall meaning is idiomatic (does not obviously derive from the individual components).

anonymousWhy I'm asking this is because we use the base form of the verb after an idiom or verbal idiom but gerund after a phrasal verb

No, there is no such rule. See the explanation for those terms above.


As for "used to", "look forward to", "[ be] to", in order to, these are all different. I suggest you start a separate thread to inquire about their usage. But before you do that, search the forum for similar threads.

Show more