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Hello

Need a little help

For words which are both noun and verb can we use its gerund and noun form interchangeably.

I like to dance/I like dancing(gerund)

I like dance (noun)

Are these correct and mean the same


Which of the following is correct

I would 'look forward to' resign from this profile

I would look forward to resigning from this profile


Thanks

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Comments  (Page 2) 

Hi CJ

Sure, there are certain words which can work as verb and noun as well for eg. Complete, attribute, intend etc. My query is why do we need to use gerund if we can use the base word itself.

Eg. I look forward to completing, can be replaced by I look forward to complete this project as complete is a noun as well and would convey the same meaning.

anonymousComplete, attribute, intend

'attribute', if pronounced differently from the verb form, can be a noun, but 'complete' and 'intend' are not nouns. They're verbs.

anonymousI look forward to completing, can be replaced by I look forward to complete this project as complete is a noun as well and would convey the same meaning.

False. 'complete' is not a noun.

anonymouswhy do we need to use gerund if we can use the base word itself.

This whole topic comes under the heading The Rules of Grammar of the English Language. These rules do not allow us to to decide for ourselves what we think might be more efficient or more logical rules.

The relevant rule here is this:
The only form of a verb that is permitted after a preposition is the -ing form.

CJ

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Ok thankyou CJ

Hi

Please find below few sentences and let me know why have/haven't we used gerunds in the following


I like (verb) to see(infinitive) him play(no gerund) why have used play as a verb not gerund or infinitive


Can I also say

I like seeing him play

Or I hate hearing him speak


I want to become rich

Here I cannot use gerund in object but I can use is as subject(why is that)

Become rich is what I want


How to know when gerund is preferred

anonymousPlease find below few sentences and let me know why have/haven't we used gerunds in the followingI like (verb) to see(infinitive) him play(no gerund) why have used play as a verb not gerund or infinitive.

I like to see / seeing him play.

"Like" can take both infinitival and gerund-participial clauses as complement.

anonymousCan I also say I like seeing him play Or I hate hearing him speak

Yes. See above.

anonymousI want to become rich. Here I cannot use gerund in object but I can use is as subject(why is that). Become rich is what I want

Here, only an infinitival clause is possible. Note that the infinitival is not object but complement of "want". The bare infinitival in "Become rich is what I want" is wrong: a to- infinitival is required: "To become rich is what I want".

anonymousHow to know when gerund is preferred

You have to become familiar with the various constructions by reading as much English material as possible. A good grammar textbook would also be helpful.

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Sure Billj, thankyou


The point I was trying to make above is if there are multiple verbs in single a sentence how to know which one would be a verbal and which would work as an action word

As in eg above I like to swim (here verb +noun) makes sense to me as the sentence structure is simple. I can figure out that subject (I) transits an action(verb-like) to object which is a noun(verbal- to swim or swimming)

-I love swimming

But when structure gets a bit complex eg. I like to see him play-

Here couldn't it be I love to see him playing

(What is play in this sentence a verbal or an action word)

So im not able to figure when to use verb in its base form to represent an action and when to make it a noun/adjective (verbal)

Are you getting my confusion

I hope I'm on the right track


Thanks again

anonymousI like to swim (here verb +noun)

No, "swim" is not a noun, but a verb. "To swim" is an infinitival clause serving as complement of "like".

anonymousI love swimming

is strictly speaking ambiguous, but verb is the more salient interpretation ("I love to swim"). Noun interpretation can be forced by adjectival premodification, as in occasional swimming.

Similarly in, for example, "I like smoking": verb preferred, but noun can't be ruled out.

anonymousBut when structure gets a bit complex eg. I like to see him play - Here couldn't it be I love to see him playing (What is play in this sentence a verbal or an action word)

I like to see him play / I like to see him playing

Both of these are fine, as I explained in my last answer. "Like", "see" and "play/playing" are all verbs.


You seem to have a fundamental misunderstanding about non-finite verbs and the clauses they occur in. Infinitival verb-forms are always verbs, and most often the ing forms are too. But see your "I love swimming" example above for the possibility of an ing form being a noun. I would advise you to avoid the term 'verbal' as it is misleading.



Hello

Please confirm if these are correct grammartically


1. I look forward to completing my tasks

2. His appeal to reconsidering (phrasal verb)

3. In order to complete my tasks


Thanks

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Hello


Which one is preferred(if all are correct)

I wish him speedy recovery(noun)

I wish you speedy recovering(gerund)

I wish you to speedly recover(infinitive)

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