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Hello

Need a little help

For words which are both noun and verb can we use its gerund and noun form interchangeably.

I like to dance/I like dancing(gerund)

I like dance (noun)

Are these correct and mean the same


Which of the following is correct

I would 'look forward to' resign from this profile

I would look forward to resigning from this profile


Thanks

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I like dancing.

"Dancing" is strictly speaking ambiguous, though verb preferred (I like to dance). Noun interpretation can be forced by adjectival premodification, as in occasional dancing.

I like dance.

"Dance" is unequivocally a noun.

I would look forward to resign resigning from this profile. (Whatever that means- BillJ)

The infinitival is ungrammatical. Only the gerund-participial is possible.

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anonymousI would look forward to resigning from this profile

I will look forward to resigning from this company.

Resigning from a profile makes no sense.

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Comments  

Sure, can I use the base word-noun and it's gerunds in place of each other

I mean gerund is to represent it's noun form so why not use the word itself.

Like - conduct /conducting, attribute /attributing, permit - permiting, conflict/conflicting ...

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anonymousSure, can I use the base word-noun and it's gerunds in place of each other

Generally no.

His conduct was terrible. (conducting is wrong).

We need to buy a fishing permit. (permitting is wrong.)
There is a conflict in Syria. (conflicting is wrong.)

How do I know that

Like I look forward to eating (makes sense to me ) as eat is a verb

But I look forward to completing or complete both sound correct to me (how to know)

Or

I look forward to permit, this sound better to me than I look forward to permitting

Also in terms of grammar why is it wrong as these are noun as well

Can you please explain

anonymousHow do I know that
Like I look forward to eating (makes sense to me ) as eat is a verb
But I look forward to completing or complete both sound correct to me (how to know)

Thinking is not really required, or a least very little.

The expression 'look forward to' takes a noun. That makes 'to' a preposition, not an infinitive marker. If you want a verb there instead of a noun, only the -ing form can be used.

I look forward to [a great future].
I look forward to [working with you / eating / completing the race / ...].

CJ

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Sure, but these words are noun also so why do we need to use its gerund.

anonymous

Sure, but these words are noun also so why do we need to use its gerund.

It's hard to understand what you've written and which post it is a reply to. Can you provide further details?

For example, which words are you referring to as nouns and gerunds?

CJ

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