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with 10-foot-pole

and

the whole nine yards.

I would not near her with10-foot-pole ( Is this sentence ok ?)

Does anyone know the above prepositonal phrases ?

Thank you
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I would not touch her with10-foot-pole.

Touch with a ten-foot pole = deal at all with; usually used with a form of negation.

The whole nine yards = all of a related set of circumstances, conditions, or details; <who could learn the most about making records, about electronics and engineering, the whole nine yards -- Stephen Stills> -- sometimes used adverbially with go to indicate an all-out effort. 1960s, originally U.S. military slang, of unknown origin; perhaps from concrete mixer trucks, which were said to have dispensed in this amount. Or the yard may be in the slang sense of "one hundred dollars." Several similar phrases meaning "Everything" arose in the 1940s ('whole ball of wax', which is likewise of obscure origin, 'whole schmear'); older examples include 'whole hog and 'whole shooting match' (1896), 'whole shebang '(1895).

(Courtesy of various online dictionaries)

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BW, search yourself for your idioms at this site:
In these cases, search with:
foot
or
yards
they are there.