Hi,
When you are tipping someone, say you give him/her a certain amount of money that is more than the actual total but want him/her to keep the rest, what would you say then?
This is what I can think of:
a) It's OK.
b) The rest is for you. (sounds strange to me)
c) Keep the rest. (sounds strange too IMO)
Let's assume you only have some bigger bills (notes for the British) and you want to give some tip but not the whole rest, what would you say?
This is what I can think of:
Make it ... (any number).
Regards,
Peter
Peter Frank popped their head over the parapet saw what was going on and said
When you are tipping someone, say you give him/her a certain amount of money that is more than the actual ... not the whole rest, what would you say? This is what I can think of: Make it ... (any number).

C for me. Maybe preface it with "Just"
Make it ... (any number) , sounds good to me
But I am a jock so english usage isn't my strong point .

yours S
Nihil curo de ista tua stulta superstitione
Hi, When you are tipping someone, say you give him/her a certain amount of money that is more than the ... It's OK. b) The rest is for you. (sounds strange to me) c) Keep the rest. (sounds strange too IMO)

In the US, these are all OK, but we also say "Keep the change". That would indicate, as well, that you don't wish to spend the time manually counting out the money, or having the driver, waiter, or whatever, to come back to you with the "change".
Let's assume you only have some bigger bills (notes for the British) and you want to give some tip but not the whole rest, what would you say? This is what I can think of: Make it ... (any number).

Since the waiter has to return to you with the balance of the money, I accept the extra money and then count out the tip, or if it is in a restaurant, and the waiter brings me the money, I can leave the tip on the table. (The bill is frequently handed to me in a small folder, or on a small plate, so I can leave the tip in the folder or on the plate.)
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Hi, When you are tipping someone, say you give him/her a certain amount of money that is more than the ... It's OK. b) The rest is for you. (sounds strange to me) c) Keep the rest. (sounds strange too IMO)

A normal BrE usage would be "Keep the change".
Let's assume you only have some bigger bills (notes for the British) and you want to give some tip but not the whole rest, what would you say? This is what I can think of: Make it ... (any number).

I'd say "Let's call it X pounds".

wrmst rgrds
Robin Bignall
Hertfordshire
England
Hi, When you are tipping someone, say you give him/her a certain amount of money that is more than the ... It's OK. b) The rest is for you. (sounds strange to me) c) Keep the rest. (sounds strange too IMO)

There's no set phrase. "Keep the change", or any of the above work. No waiter or waitress will be offended if you use any phrase as long as the amount is sufficient. Sometimes I just say "Thanks for the service" and they understand the remaining amount is theirs.
Let's assume you only have some bigger bills (notes for the British) and you want to give some tip but not the whole rest, what would you say? This is what I can think of: Make it ... (any number).

Again, no set phrase. I usually say "Bring me back $x.00" (specifying the amount of change I want back) but anything that communicates the idea is just fine.
There's an annoying new thing that some waiters/waitresses try to pull: You give them a $20 bill for a $12.00 check and they ask "Do you need change?" The idea is to shame you into over-tipping. I usually answer "Damn right I do. Bring me back $x.00." and then tip the minimum.
Hi, When you are tipping someone, say you give him/her a certain amount of money that is more than the ... It's OK. b) The rest is for you. (sounds strange to me) c) Keep the rest. (sounds strange too IMO)

Here in Canada, I just gesture (kind of a "stop" thing with palm raised towards the money) and thank the server. They don't need much of a hint to keep the change. It's more of an annoyance when they return with a combination of coins and notes that forces you to choose between giving them almost no tip or a very handsome one. I try to carry enough change that it never happens, or at least to pre-empt it by asking for "small change, please".
Let's assume you only have some bigger bills (notes for the British) and you want to give some tip but not the whole rest, what would you say? This is what I can think of: Make it ... (any number).

"I only need a five back". Only if the person is making change right there, and only if it's not caused more trouble than it's worth in the past in a similar situation (they may have to keep their tip money and the establishment's money separate, and may have trouble doing it in that sequence).
Best regards,
Spehro Pefhany

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