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I have a doubt about a sentence taken from the audio of an old American movie released in 1956

This is what I think they say:

Man: Maria, did you hide Ann's purse behind the drapes?
Woman: Yes, I pinned it there, but you must not tell her.

Does "pinned it there" mean in this context "put it there" or "hid it there""?, or

Is not "pinned" what she says? Maybe another verb that sounds alike? I've only found for "pin" as a verb the following meanings:

1. To fasten or secure with or as if with a pin or pins.2. To transfix.3. To place in a position of trusting dependence: He pinned his faith on an absurdity.4. To hold fast; immobilize: He was pinned under the wreckage of the truck.5. (Sports) To win a fall from in wrestling. None of them make sense to me in the context. This is the link to the short audio clip (13 seconds), just in case you think I misheard something.

https://clyp.it/1dydlikj

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It sounds as if she says "pinned". I don't know any interpretation here other than the literal one of "fixed/fastened (to something) with a pin". Perhaps she fastened the purse to the drapes.

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Thanks for your answer, GPY, but I watched the movie and the purse wasn't fastened to the drapes with a pin. What happened is that somebody put it on the floor behind the curtain to hide it. That's why I doubted about the use of the verb "pin" here. Moreover, the woman uses again the verb some minutes later when she tolds the man how she found the purse. (I pulled aside the curtain and there was the purse. I guess someone had hid it there to drive me insane.)

In fact, "pinned" can also mean wedged between two things (e.g. between the window frame and a curtain pole, say), but this also would not fit with the purse lying on the floor -- unless it fell down later. Other than that, I don't know. Perhaps someone else has an idea.

CarolMontesMoreover, the woman uses again the verb some minutes later when she tolds the man how she found the purse. (I pulled aside the curtain and there was the purse. I guess someone had hid it there to drive me insane.)

You say that she used the verb again, by which I assume you mean the verb "pin", but the quote that you provide does not contain this word.

You are right, GPY, she uses "hid", not "pin" the second time. That made me think that both verbs could have the same meaning in this context.

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CarolMontesDoes "pinned it there" mean in this context "put it there" or "hid it there""?

The OED has a main entry for this "pin", separate from the ordinary one. It is very old, with two obsolete definitions. It means "To confine, to imprison; to hem in; (also) to shut up; spec. to put (an animal) in a pound, fold, etc.; to impound." They call it rare and point out that it is often hard to differentiate from the ordinary word "pin". The speaker in the audio clip sounds vaguely British to me, but they used to talk that way in Hollywood movies in those days.