Can anyone tell me whether these two words are truly hominyms, or is there supposed to be a big difference in their pronunciation. This has become a huge issue between my fiancee and I, with her claiming that the difference is far from subtle. The way she emphasizes it there is certainly a notable difference with the two words being pronounced as "pit-chur" and "pick-chur", respectively. This does not agree with the way I hear most people pronounce the two words, however. Can anyone shed some light on this subject?

Thank you,
lmeeder
1 2
Hi Imeeder,

'Picture' is pronounced piktchur

Pitcher = pitchur
It's true that many people make the mistake of pronouncing these words the same way, but apparently your fiancee holds you to a higher standard - she wants you to pronounce each word correctly!
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There is a big difference, and it has to do with your basic pronunciation. Say "pit" and then say "pic"...is there a difference?

Some people may not hear the difference, then I would reccomend an audiologist. I think most people don't care and just say what is easier. It's part of the process of dumbing down of everything. It ends with humanity destroying itself and the earth returning to nature - which is fine by me. Miserable humans!

-Bob McGrath
lmeederwith her claiming that the difference is far from subtle.
She's right.

lmeederThis does not agree with the way I hear most people pronounce the two words, however. Can anyone shed some light on this subject?
Provided you don't have a hearing problem, and these people are really pronouncing both words the same, you need to start hanging out with a better class of people! Emotion: rofl

CJ
AnonymousIt ends with humanity destroying itself and the earth returning to nature - which is fine by me. Miserable humans!
LOL!

What makes you so sure the asteroid won't get us first? Emotion: smile

CJ
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Provided you don't have a hearing problem, and these people are really pronouncing both words the same, you need to start hanging out with a better class of people!
Actually, though this isn't in any list of such traits I've looked at, this can be dialectual. That is, just like in Boston or London it is correct to drop 'r' sounds at the end of words, but in Glasgow or San Francisco it is not, this is not accepted in most places, it is in others. Where I'm from, everybody pronounces them the same. This actually came up several times before I left when somebody wanted something passed or what have you. It had little to do with class, and more to do with marking whether you belonged or not, so if you pronounced the 'c' (which to me sounds ugly) you were a foreigner and didn't belong. As for it being 'right' or not, it isn't in RP or standard USA English, but it is certainly standard where I'm from.
There is a definite difference in pronunciation.

For Pitcher it is pronounced "pic-shur" and for Picture it is "pic-tchur," not “pitch-er.

PIT-chur= pitcher. The PIT sound is definite.

PIC-tchur= picture. The "PIC" is definitely there, and the T sound is subtle and quick, not as heavily pronounced as it is in the word pitcher, but should be there as well. I'm going by American pronunciation, by the way.

Many people simply are lazy in their speech, and they don't emphasize good diction, but as you can see just from this example, proper diction (or lack of it) can make the difference as to whether your words are understood. In fact, I have a funny story about these very words and how good diction is so important. Allow me to prattle briefly...

I went to an estate sale the other day with a friend. We saw a lovely lovely pitcher that was shaped like a rooster. We were considering buying it, but decided to pass on it. Nonetheless, my friend really loved the pitcher since it reminded her of a friendly little Bantam rooster that she had at one time.

I couldn't stop thinking of how much my friend admired the little rooster pitcher, so I went back to the sale the next day to see if I could buy it before someone else got it. Luckily, it was still available, though it was close. Another customer wanted that pitcher and was almost ready to buy it, but changed his mind at the very last second. I bought the pitcher-- and it was marked to half price! My lucky day!

As I was riding home on the bus with that prize in my lap, I was speaking with another friend on the phone. I told him about the "cool rooster pitcher" I bought for our friend. I described it only by color, and how it looked like "Dandy", the dearly-departed Bantam. "I know she'll love that pitcher; it's just beautiful!".

After I finished my call, a sweet old lady turned to me and said, "Ma'am, I'm a retired school teacher. I couldn't help overhearing your call there a moment ago and I just had to say something. I hope you'll forgive me, but one of my pet peeves is poor diction and misusing words. I overheard you talking about a 'picture' of a rooster that you got for your friend."

I replied, "Yes, ma'am. We saw it at an estate sale-- it's a pitcher...", and she halted me at that point.

"I think you're trying to say 'picture' but it's coming out as 'pitcher'.

"Yes ma'am. I found this pitcher at the estate sale back there. It's a rooster because she raises chickens."

The teacher said, "Can you please do me a favor? Say PIC-tchur... PIC-tchur".

I said, "PIC-tchur... PIC-tchur"

She replied, "Good. Now, tell me what you found for your friend."

"Okay, I found a pitcher..."

By now she was frustrated... "You found a PIC-tchur?"

"Ma'am", I answered, "I found this rooster. It is a PIT-chur. PIT-chur. You know, like what you use to pour tea or lemonade." (I live in Texas, where tea is generally understood to be iced, not hot... and very, very sweet! And here, 'picture' and 'pitcher' do sound very similar because of the Texas Twang... the local accent.) Then I opened the box and showed her.

I had to open the box to show her the PITCHER, because the box had no PICTURE.Emotion: smile

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