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Hi!

I have a question.

Many people say both "place to live" and "place to live in" in such sentences as below:

a) I found a new place to live.
b) I found a new place to live in.

To the best of my knowledge, the sentence a) is grammatically incorrect. So I googled the two phrases and got the results as follows:

She is happy to have found such a nice place to live in.
Cambridge is an attractive place, and quite an easy place to live in.
The world will be a better place to live in.
Bali is a wonderful place to live in.
Few care about making the world a better place to live in.
...............................................................................................................................................
It's a better place to live.
It's hard to find a place to live quickly.
I always dream of flying to USA because that's a wonderful place to live and to study.
Los Angeles is a pleasant place to live.
I found a new place to live, in West Ham.

Are both a) and b) grammartically acceptable/correct? If so, why?

Greatly looking forward to your insight.

Thanks in advance.

Jae From ROK
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Hello

I too am a leaner but I am glad if I could help you with my humble knowledge.

'Place' is a *** noun.
It is a noun but also it can work as a location-adverb without help of prepositions.

(1) I have to find some place to sleep.
Here 'some place' is the object noun of 'find' but it is also the adverb for 'sleep'.

(2) I have to find some place to sleep in.
We cannot say (2) is ungrammatical but (1) is more idiomatic.
Google survey gives 1,330,000 hits for 'place to live' & 205,000 for 'place to live in'.

paco
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Without context, I'd say:
"I've found a new place ...
And it would be easier to say "I've found a new house/home", since both "house" and"home" imply that you live there.
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Comments  
Dear Paco:

Excuse me to draw your atttention back to this issue. But would you please tell me if both of the following are acceptable too:

I have to find a room to sleep.

I have to find a room to sleep in.

Thank you for the trouble.
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Hello Chang

1. I have to find a room to sleep.
2. I have to find a room to sleep in.
I'll choose #2 because "a room to sleep in" is kind of a fixed noun phrase. If I happened to find the sentence #1 somewhere, I would read it as "I have to find a room in order to sleep", but it sounds somewhat weird to me.

paco