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Areff premed:

That does seem odd, if only because any American should be familiar with Yosemite Sam.

I'm familiar with Yosemite Sam, but for many years I thought the name rhymed with Vegemite Sam.

So Vegemite sounds like virginity? I never knew.
Ben Zimmer filted:
I'm familiar with Yosemite Sam, but for many years I thought the name rhymed with Vegemite Sam.

If that were the case, Bugs Bunny would call out, "Yo, Semite Sam!"

And Sam would mutter under his breath, "I hates that farkakteh varmint!"...r
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I'm familiar with Yosemite Sam, but for many years I thought the name rhymed with Vegemite Sam.

So Vegemite sounds like virginity? I never knew.

So what does virginity sound like?
Matti
"Ah" issometimes pronounced like a "short 'a'" (the vowel in "cat"), as in some pronunciations of "Ah, shaddup!" but ... eastern Asia") to 1839: It comes from "Portuguese ama wet nurse, from Medieval Latin amma. "

In Section B of yesterday's St. Paul Pioneer Press ("Local News") I came across two family names with a quite different origin from those given above, "Dahl" and "Dahline." A search of the Internet makes it appear that they (and the variant "Dahlin") are Germanic names, "Dahline" and "Dahlin" being found particularly in Scandinavian countries.

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
I imagine that's also the reason why Americans usually mispronounce ... "Brisbane",

They doubtless mispronounce the Australian city, but I suspect that Australians mispronounce the (much smaller) city of the same name in California, which is Briz-bayne.

I'd be prepared to bet that 99.99% of Australians will never mispronounce it.
Does anyone here know the Scottish pronunciation? I imagine it is somewhere between the two.

Regards
John
for mail: my initials plus those of alt.usage.english at tpg dot com dot au
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I quite understand why rhotic people would find the usual ... in the language where the combination "uh" represents this sound?

Good point, "uh" doesn't really appear in traditional English words, does it? Searching on in Onelook gives a list ... can call meaningful sounds, words) "uh" and "duh" actually use it. "Uh-huh" isn't quite the same, being a nasal "unh-hunh."

Now I'm confused. What does short-U have to do with it? Wasn't Athel talking about the sound we often represent by er, ur, ir the vowel in non-rhotic 'fern', 'fir' and 'burn', or /V"/ in ASCII-IPA? I've seen rhotic speakers use 'uh' to represent that sound. Short-U is /V/ unrounded, which is what 'uh' suggests to me.

Regards
John
for mail: my initials plus those of alt.usage.english at tpg dot com dot au
So Vegemite sounds like virginity? I never knew.

So what does virginity sound like?

Is that a koan? CDB
An American friend heard me say Yosemite and told me ... he had recently moved to California from Philadelphia, but still...

That does seem odd, if only because any American should be familiar with Yosemite Sam.

There's often a leap to be made between something you've heard and something you've seen written down when the two have not been connected with each other. I'd heard 'Yosemmity' Sam in the cartoons and seen references to the 'Yozzer-might' national park. Some time elapsed before I realised they are the same thing.
Similarly, my Mother sometimes spoke of 'salver-latterly' as a form of sovereign medication that would have been useful if only would had some at certain moments. And my youthful taste for trad Brit detective mysteries had introduced me to the mysterious sal voller-tile that was available in small bottles and could be substituted by rare poison distilled from South American frogs. Much time elapsed before I was made something the wiser. 'Mizzle' we all know.

John Dean
Oxford
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So what does virginity sound like?

Is that a koan? CDB

Or a song by Leonard Koan?

John Dean
Oxford
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