1 7 8 9 10  12 13 14
This isn't versions of time honored Spanish place names but ... gets hold of Spanish words as used as place names.

When we first moved to Los Angeles, my mother did not have a car and took the bus everywhere.

Didn't this annoy the other passengers?

John Dean
Oxford
I quite understand why rhotic people would find the usual ... in the language where the combination "uh" represents this sound?

Good point, "uh" doesn't really appear in traditional English words, does it? Searching on in Onelook gives a list full of exotic things like "fuhrer" and "brouhaha".

Indeed. A quick scan of the 222 words the OED CD identifies from a ( *uh* ) search included only one that seemed to have a British origin - Glenurquhart (I'm not counting 'huh')

John Dean
Oxford
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Good point, "uh" doesn't really appear in traditional English words, ... a list full of exotic things like "fuhrer" and "brouhaha".

Indeed. A quick scan of the 222 words the OED CD identifies from a ( *uh* ) search included only one that seemed to have a British origin - Glenurquhart (I'm not counting 'huh')

And goodness knows how that is pronounced.
So this would explain why your team keeps doing those "Winnie-ther-Pooh" sound spellings. You don't feel you have a native alternative. Whereas we grew up with "win-uh-puh-SAH-kee" and the like. (No pun intended, but I do think explanations for Native American words was a large part of the need.)
While in the other direction, our team doesn't have a way to sound-spell that noise you put into "fern" and "world." "Feun" is as close as I can come, and that's probably because there's a related sound in French and Dutch, but that's not universally known.
(I appreciated the "sal volatile" story I never heard it pronunced, so...)

Best Donna Richoux
Good point, "uh" doesn't really appear in traditional English words, ... it. "Uh-huh" isn't quite the same, being a nasal "unh-hunh."

Now I'm confused. What does short-U have to do with it? Wasn't Athel talking about the sound we often represent ... rhotic speakers use 'uh' to represent that sound. Short-U is /V/ unrounded, which is what 'uh' suggests to me.

Well, that's a continual problem, isn't it? Since Americans (by and large) don't say "er" the same way British people (by and large) do, how are we* supposed to know what is meant by "er"? We see the British using it where *we would use "uh." I've also seen it used for the other sound you're talking about, the one I just wrote about in another post. That's a sound that doesn't exist in most Americans' basic vocabulary, though maybe it's in foreign loan words.
Let me go back and look at the posts in this thread... Athel was writing about "eye-beeth-uh", and his post appears to me to show that he knows what the Americans mean by "uh" in that. I'd say the sound ranges from the short-U-of-"cup" when fully stressed, to the schwa when said quickly and unstressed but it's not the British "her fern" thing.

I've seen those words and sounds discussed here for years, and no one ever seems to get to the bottom of it. Maybe someone could make a FAQ page just on this, with some associated sound files...

Best Donna Richoux
John Dean typed thus:
When we first moved to Los Angeles, my mother did not have a car and took the bus everywhere.

Didn't this annoy the other passengers?

Or the other people using the swimming pool?

David
==
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Indeed. A quick scan of the 222 words the OED ... have a British origin - Glenurquhart (I'm not counting 'huh')

And goodness knows how that is pronounced.

I'm familiar with the pronunciation of Urquhart, so my non-rhotic guess would be:
GlenERkuht
Matti
John Dean typed thus:

Didn't this annoy the other passengers?

Got that joke.
Or the other people using the swimming pool?

Didn't get this one.

Dena Jo
Email goes to denajo2 at the dot com variation of the Yahoo domain. Have I confused you? Go here:
http://myweb.cableone.net/denajo/emailme.htm
Dena Jo typed thus:

If she took the bus everywhere, she must have taken it with her when she went swimming

David
==
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Similarly, my Mother sometimes spoke of 'salver-latterly' as a form of sovereign medication that would have been useful if only ... poison distilled from South American frogs. Much time elapsed before I was made something the wiser. 'Mizzle' we all know.

I don't think I've ever heard it pronounced. Nor have I ever bothered to look it up. Until now. Now I don't have to bother learning anything new for the rest of the day.

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >The Elizabethans had so many words
1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 >for the female genitals that it isPalo Alto, CA 94304 >quite hard to speak a sentence of

http://www.kirshenbaum.net /
Show more