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"Eh" is often pronounced /E/ (the vowel in "bed"), but it comes from Middle English "ey," which I expect was a diphthong, and even today is pronounced /e/ by many English speakers.

/ei/ for me, and that's the only way I've ever been aware of hearing it.
I see, as a result of a search in MWCD11, that "eh" is used for /E/ in "Dehra Dun," a ... pronounced in the original language. "Eh" is used in "heh," a type of laugh, and "feh," an originally Yiddish exclamation.

And in both of those it's /E/.
"Ah" is sometimes pronounced like a "short 'a'" (the vowel in "cat"), as in some pronunciations of "Ah, shaddup!"

Also "dahlia", for some reason.
but more often pronounced like a "short 'o'" (the vowel in "log").

That's the vowel in "lot" but not "log", for some of us American CINCs. (Wait, isn't that W?)
It is used when representing /A/ in foreign words such as such as "Ahvaz," "Ahmed," and "Ahriman" one or two ... in eastern Asia") to 1839: It comes from "Portuguese ama wet nurse, from Medieval Latin amma. "...

Also /ei/ in "Mahlon", and I've heard "Frida Kahlo" as /'fri:[email protected] 'keiloU/. This might have something to with undiacriticized spellings of German words containing a-umlaut h. Or with ignorance.

Jerry Friedman
She was a hot chick, but I didn't realize that at the time, of course. Later I wondered how my dad managed to get her.

Oral sex.

Dena Jo
Email goes to denajo2 at the dot com variation of the Yahoo domain. Have I confused you? Go here:
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"Ah" is sometimes pronounced like a "short 'a'" (the vowel in "cat"), as in some pronunciations of"Ah, shaddup!"

Also "dahlia", for some reason.

That usually has /eI/ in BrE, I think. My Chambers (1993) says (converting to ASCII IPA) that it has /A/ in the US.
I have /a/ in the surname Dahl (as in Roald), rhyming with "pal", but I think my accent has lost the distinction between /a/ and /A:/ before a word-final /l/.
but more often pronounced like a "short 'o'" (the vowel in "log").

That's the vowel in "lot" but not "log", for some of us American CINCs. (Wait, isn't that W?)

And of course "ah" completely fails to represent the vowel in "lot" and/or "log" to those of us who distinguish "father" and "bother".

Jonathan
She was a hot chick, but I didn't realize that at the time, of course. Later I wondered how my dad managed to get her.

Oral sex.

Probably. Somehow, that is difficult to picture about one's parents.
Skitt (in Hayward, California)
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She was a hot chick, but I didn't realize that at the time, of course. Later I wondered how my dad managed to get her.

Oral sex.

Nonsense. Our generation invented it.
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Spehro Pefhany

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"Ah" is sometimes pronounced like a "short 'a'" (the vowel in "cat"), as in some pronunciations of "Ah, shaddup!" but ... foreign words such as such as "Ahvaz," "Ahmed," and "Ahriman" one or two of those "h"s were probably pronounced originally.

In romanized Arabic words, there are actually two kinds of "h" that end up represented as : a glottal fricative (like English /h/) and a pharyngeal fricative (/H/ in ASCII IPA, or h with a dot under it in some transliterations). So "Ahmad" or "Ahmed", for instance, is an attempt to represent /'aHmad/. When Arabic terms enter a language that doesn't have the /h/~/H/ distinction, the pharyngeal fricative often becomes rephonemicized as /h/ (this is the case in Malay/Indonesian, for instance, and I think also true of most dialects of Urdu, Persian, and Turkish). But such languages still usually allow /h/ after a vowel, which most English dialects do not, so Arabic /'aHmad/ would become /'ahmad/ to a speaker of Urdu or Malay, not /'amad/. (In AmE, "Ahmad" can turn into something like /@'mA:d/, as in "Ahmad Rashad".)
MWCD11 dates "amah" ("a female servant in eastern Asia") to 1839: It comes from "Portuguese ama wet nurse, from Medieval Latin amma. "

Same with "ayah", from Portuguese "aia" meaning "nurse, governess". I suspect that as these Portuguese words began to be used on the Indian subcontinent, they were presumed to be of local origin and so were given spellings that looked local, on the analogy of "rajah", "wallah", etc. (Surprisingly, the Anglo-Indian dictionary Hobson-Jobson doesn't shed any light on this.)
Dena Jo typed thus:

Oddly enough, and even though we lived in California, I ... bath. I never saw my mother in a bathing suit.

It was the most incongruous place to take a bus which I could think of in a hurry.

Where would you take a bus you can think of at length?

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >You may hate gravity, but gravity
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Evan Kirshenbaum typed thus:
Dena Jo typed thus: It was the most incongruous place to take a bus which I could think of in a hurry.

Where would you take a bus you can think of at length?

Yes. It's ugly, isn't it. Never mind, you can't win them all.

David
==
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"Ah,

Also "dahlia", for some reason.

That usually has /eI/ in BrE, I think. My Chambers (1993) says (converting to ASCII IPA) that it has /A/ in the US.

NSOED agrees with you and Chambers on BrE. AHD and MWCD have /&/, /A/,
/eI/ in that order, with MWCD ecumenically noting that /eI/ is usual in
Britain.
I have /a/ in the surname Dahl (as in Roald), rhyming with "pal", but I think my accent has lost the distinction between /a/ and /A:/ before a word-final /l/.

Huh. That might be the situation where the two sounds are the most different for me. I have /A/ in that name.
That's the vowel in "lot" but not "log", for some of us American CINCs. (Wait, isn't that W?)

And of course "ah" completely fails to represent the vowel in "lot" and/or "log" to those of us who distinguish "father" and "bother".

Right. I was thinking of mentioning that.

Jerry Friedman
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