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Also "dahlia", for some reason.

On the soil of Australia
My Aunt Dahlia
Was no failure:
Her coreopsis
Were no flopsis,
But among the cognoscenti her euphorbia
Induced euphoria.
Mike.
Also "dahlia", for some reason.

On the soil of Australia My Aunt Dahlia Was no failure: Her coreopsis Were no flopsis, But among the cognoscenti her euphorbia Induced euphoria.

ISTR a limerick in the film Breaker Morant recited by Lt. Hancock (Bryan Brown's character) that went something like:

There was a young man from Australia
Who painted his *** like a dahlia
The colour was fine,
Likewise the design,
But the aroma, ah, that was a failure.
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"Ah" is sometimes pronounced like a "short 'a'" (the vowel ... one or two of those "h"s were probably pronounced originally.

In romanized Arabic words, there are actually two kinds of "h" that end up represented as : a glottal fricative ... (this is the case in Malay/Indonesian, for instance, and I think also true of most dialects of Urdu, Persian, and

persian renders /H/ as (h) so languages that had acquired arabic through persian such as Turkish and Urdu render /H/ as (h) . it is (*kh*) in turkic languages that don't have /h/.
"Ah" is sometimes pronounced like a "short 'a'" (the vowel ... two of those "h"s were probably pronounced > > originally.

In romanized Arabic words, there are actually two kinds of "h" that end > up represented as : a glottal ... is the case in Malay/Indonesian, for > instance, and I think also true of most dialects of Urdu, Persian, and

persian renders /H/ as (h) so languages that had acquired arabic through persian such as Turkish and Urdu render /H/ as (h) . it is (*kh*) in turkic languages that don't have /h/.
turkish prefers front vowels with original /h/ and back vowels with original /H/.
"er" as the

I think Athel was talking about a schwa, /@/, as in a common BrE pronunciation of "Ibiza" as /aI'bi:[email protected]/. A non-rhotic British "pronunciation spelling" of that might be "eye-BEETH-er", with "er" for the schwa.

Yes, that's exactly what I was talking about, and more specifically about an unstressed schwa as in the first vowel of "potato" rather than the longer stressed sound that occurs in words like "fern" (as spoken by a non-rhotic person).
Some Americans, including both Donna and Raymond, seem to think of schwa and "short U" as being, in some sense, ... be why "uh" gets used freely for both in American pronunciation spellings, but it's confusing for the rest of us.

I've seen this way of representing a schwa in AmE sources for many years, so it was quite clear to me what it meant. What was not clear was why this combination was chosen when it appears not to be used that way in the spelling of any normal word, assuming we don't regard "Glenurquhart" as a normal word. Even in "Glenurquhart" I would question whether it is the "uh" that represents the schwa: I think it is more likely that "quh" represents a k sound and that "ar" represents the schwa.
athel

Athel Cornish-Bowden
http://bip.cnrs-mrs.fr/bip10/homepage.htm
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