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They do... so how is "Packard" (which looks Anglo-Britic enough) pronounced in BrE? Surely not like "picard" or something of that sort?

/'p&ka:d/ i.e. with the second syllable like "mallard", "mudguard" and "schoolyard", rather than "L. Ron Hubbard", "***" or, er, "Howard".

Ross Howard
Why do all English people, it seems when I listen ... symbols) and the 'normal' pronunciation of the American company name?

'Hewlett PACK ard' though is what I've always assumed to be correct. What exactly *is* "the 'normal' pronunciation of the American company name?" I'm guessing something like 'Hewlett Pack'rd' ?

Pretty much. Americans tend to pronounce it the way that Dave Packard did, with the end of the word essentially "curd", but reduced. Brits (including those at HP) tend to pronounce it with a full "card".

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >When you rewrite a compiler from
1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 >scratch, you sometimes fix thingsPalo Alto, CA 94304 >you didn't know were broken.

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I've also heard BBC folks pronounce "Michigan" with the first syllable like "Mitch".

"There's a place called Tchicago: I've seen it on the map. There's a place called Mary Land: I've seen it on the map. There's a place in America called Alburcuecue,
And I'm hoping it's a bit like Donegal.."
Maury Yeston, Titanic: The Musical
-Aaron J. Dinkin
Dr. Whom
I can half understand why we don't say Paree, but why shouldn't English speaking people be able to sort out ... ard' instead of 'Mare lind' (Ok, I can't do Fontanian symbols) and the 'normal' pronunciation of the American company name?

When you sing 'The despot's heel is at thy door...' how do you pronounce Maryland then?

John Dean
Oxford
They do... so how is "Packard" (which looks Anglo-Britic enough) pronounced in BrE? Surely not like "picard" or something of that sort?

Sort of like "pack card", but without the double /k/
/'p&ka:d/ i.e. with the second syllable like "mallard", "mudguard" and "schoolyard", rather than "L. Ron Hubbard", "***" or, er, "Howard".

Presumably for those who don't pronounce "mallard" to rhyme with the last three. (I do.)

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >A handgun is like a Lawyer. You
1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 >don't want it lying around wherePalo Alto, CA 94304 >the children might be exposed to
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
snip
'Hewlett PACK ard' though is what I've always assumed to ... American company name?" I'm guessing something like 'Hewlett Pack'rd' ?

Pretty much. Americans tend to pronounce it the way that Dave Packard did, with the end of the word essentially "curd", but reduced. Brits (including those at HP) tend to pronounce it with a full "card".

Just a wandering-mind question: was the automobile pronounced the same way, or with a "card" sound?
(I never knew anyone who owned a Packard, so I wouldn't personally know.)

Cheers, Harvey
Ottawa/Toronto/Edmonton for 30 years;
Southern England for the past 22 years.
(for e-mail, change harvey.news to harvey.van)
On 13 Aug 2004, Evan Kirshenbaum wrote

snip

Pretty much. Americans tend to pronounce it the way that ... at HP) tend to pronounce it with a full "card".

Just a wandering-mind question: was the automobile pronounced the same way, or with a "card" sound? (I never knew anyone who owned a Packard, so I wouldn't personally know.)

Same as in Hewlett-Packard; pack-erd. See:
http://summerville-novascotia.com/Packard / for some pictures of truly great looking cars. Packard, however, set new levels in ostentatiousness in design in the mid-fifties with their Caribbean series.
For those that know the cars, note the similarities of the late-50s Packards to the Studebaker models. Packard purchased Studebaker in
1954.
On 13 Aug 2004, Evan Kirshenbaum wrote

snip

Pretty much. Americans tend to pronounce it the way that ... at HP) tend to pronounce it with a full "card".

Just a wandering-mind question: was the automobile pronounced the same way, or with a "card" sound? (I never knew anyone who owned a Packard, so I wouldn't personally know.)

I've never owned a Packard but older people going down memory lane about cars that they or their parents owned pronounce it Pack'rd (not a card in the pack).
Nell
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They do... so how is "Packard" (which looks Anglo-Britic enough) pronounced in BrE? Surely not like "picard" or something of that sort?

/'p&ka:d/ i.e. with the second syllable like "mallard", "mudguard" and "schoolyard", rather than "L. Ron Hubbard", "***" or, er, "Howard".

I see. That seems rather inconsistent, but then consider "Bernard" for a sort of vice-a-versa case.
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