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I can half understand why we don't say Paree, but ... symbols) and the 'normal' pronunciation of the American company name?

When you sing 'The despot's heel is at thy door...' how do you pronounce Maryland then?

Or in Maryland! My Maryland!?
(Is that !? sequence acceptable round here?)

Paul
In bocca al Lupo!
I can half understand why we don't say Paree, but ... symbols) and the 'normal' pronunciation of the American company name?

I've never noticed 'Mary land' on the BBC. I think I pronounce it correctly, but then I have family there. ... endless, and I think we should at least spell places as the natives do, even if we can't pronounce them.

Why? Munich is arguably closer to the original name of the place than is München.

Rob Bannister
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
}> 'Hewlett PACK ard' though is what I've always assumed to be correct. What }> exactly *is* "the 'normal' pronunciation of the American company name?" I'm }> guessing something like 'Hewlett Pack'rd' ?
}
} /[email protected] 'p&kRd/ or /eItS pi/.
Or /di: waI/ for those that have the laptops.

R. J. Valentine
}>
}> I can half understand why we don't say Paree, but why shouldn't }> English speaking people be able to sort out the local pronunciations }> of proper nouns in English speaking countries? Why do all English }> people, it seems when I listen to the BBC, pronounce 'Maryland' as }> 'Mary land' and 'Hewlett Packard' as 'Hewlett PACK ard' instead of }> 'Mare lind' (Ok, I can't do Fontanian symbols)
}
} Say what? In New York we pronounce "Maryland" as though it were written } "Merralind" /[email protected]@nd/ "merry" vowel in the first syllable and schwa in } the second. Three syllables.
"Merralind" is pretty much how people have pronounced it in the almost forty years I've lived here (all of it in Prince George's County, named for Prince George of Denmark, consort of Queen Anne, daughter of James II and VIII, son of Henriette Marie (for whom Maryland is named), daughter of Henri IV of France and Navarre), an easy walk south of Laurel proper (the heart of The Laurelplex (Fourth Largest Metropolitan Area in America)).

Secondary stress on the third syllable (more there than on the second).

} Now, granted, most Americans have no Mary/merry distinction, and some, } like Sparky and erk, go so far as to include marry in the mix. But until } now I hadn't thought that some Americans pronounce "Maryland" as a } two-syllable word, "mare-lind".
It's all in how one-syllable you consider "mare". Mr. Riggs isn't so much wrong as interesting in the way he divides it up, but I don't really hear that many people giving the "mare" vowel to "Maryland". There's a lot of variety in the pronunciation around the core "Merralind", some going to "Murralind" and others using more of a "cat" vowel. I'd expect a distinct "Mary-land" only from a BBC World reporter that hadn't spent much time here.
When I give my mailing address on the phone, I used to give it as Arjay Valentine (V as in Victor, A-L-E-N T-I-N-E), P-O (as in Post Office) Drawer (as in Dresser) V (as in Victor or Valentine), Laurel L-A-U-R-E-L, Merralind (that's M-D), 2-Oh-7-2-5. Any other way would cause some discussion or other, and this way usually got through on the first try.

(The lettered boxes used to run from A to Y except I, but they had been converting them to numbers as people gave them up, until it was down to me at V (I'm the only one that ever rented it) and the Laurel Leader at L (I think that they're the only ones that ever rented that) when they remodeled the post office and installed only pre-numbered boxes, assuring me that they'd always deliver mail addressed to V, anyway.)

(Why "Drawer", one might ask. It was down near the floor, pulled out, and was accessible from the top. People who wrote it down as "box" almost invariably translated the "V" to "5", which was a whole nother box.)

R. J. Valentine
Just a wandering-mind question: was the automobile pronounced the same way, or with a "card" sound? (I never knew anyone who owned a Packard, so I wouldn't personally know.)

A friend's father owned one, and they (and everyone else I knew) pronounced it "PACK-ard".
I'd love to have one to try on the proliferatinhg speed bumps we have nowadays.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
(I never knew anyone who owned a Packard, so I wouldn't personally know.)

Same as in Hewlett-Packard; pack-erd. See: http://summerville-novascotia.com/Packard / for some pictures of truly great looking cars. Packard, however, set new levels in ostentatiousness in design in the mid-fifties with their Caribbean series.

Their best looking cars were made mostly during the 30s. My father used to collect that series, and all of them were beauties.
For those that know the cars, note the similarities of the late-50s Packards to the Studebaker models. Packard purchased Studebaker in 1954.

They went to pot after the war.
Mercedes Benz also produced some beautiful cars. For a longer period of time, with them.

Charles Riggs
I can half understand why we don't say Paree, but ... symbols) and the 'normal' pronunciation of the American company name?

When you sing 'The despot's heel is at thy door...' how do you pronounce Maryland then?

Hum a few bars, John, and perhaps I'll remember it. Then I'd be able to tell you.

Charles Riggs
When you sing 'The despot's heel is at thy door...' how do you pronounce Maryland then?

Or in Maryland! My Maryland!? (Is that !? sequence acceptable round here?)

We accept it, since we can't get rid of it, but it is highly frowned upon by the purists among us. I rather like it, but would have avoided it in this case by writing 'Or in "Maryland! My Maryland!"?

Still somewhat dodgy I now realise.

Charles Riggs
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
}> }> I can half understand why we don't say Paree, but why shouldn't }> English speaking people be able ... second. Three syllables. "Merralind" is pretty much how people have pronounced it in the almost forty years I've lived here...

I agree that Richard's rendition is the more accurate one. I don't do pronunciations well, but I've been known to use my rendition, along with having heard it many times, although not as often, proportionately, in PG or in finer Montgomery, lift your pinky, county, as further south.

Charles Riggs
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